TREAT Help File

Welcome to the TREAT help file, your source for the most up-to-date information about TREAT. In addition to this manual you can also visit our knowledgebase page for additional FAQs. Training videos are also available and recommended for all new TREAT users.

See latest features and key changes here.

Version History Notes

Changes in 3.4.6 (NYSERDA Approved for New Workflow):

  • ***Ability to specify attached on one or two sides in house type drop down
  • Room AC efficiencies should be entered as EER
  • HPXML Translation Improvements and Fixes
  • Added siding and radiant barrier inputs under advanced surface properties
  • Restored NY Home Performance Report
  • HPXML Translation Improvements and Fixes
  • Allow multiple visual inspections/measurements of type ‘other’

Changes in 3.4.5:

  • Cooling system improvements default to reuse existing distributions
  • Adjusted visual inspection library
  • ***Renamed Improvement Packages report to Package Cost by Improvement
  • Additional data displayed in Energy Savings Summary Report
  • Third party certifications for windows and doors
  • Movable R value, screening and external shading for windows available in custom properties screen
  • Third party certifications for HVAC and DHW
  • *** Changed the way TREAT handles HVAC improvements – it is now possible to correctly model a heating plant upgrade, cooling plant upgrade and distribution insulation in one package.
  • ***A new utility bill import spreadsheet is included with more functionality
  • Improvements to the daily weather import spreadsheet
  • Changed default analysis period to better capture a whole year of data
  • Renamed default package implementation types
  • Enhancements to HPXML 2.1 export
  • HPXML 2.0 and 1.1.1 reports no longer present on new installs

Changes in 3.4.4:

  • Added usage and base usage tables to Energy Saving Summary report
  • Updated Weather Import spreadsheet
  • Collect Window Screening type
  • Storm door and window screening in HPXML (2.0 & 2.1)

 

Changes in 3.4.3:

  • New daily weather download spreadsheet supporting > 2000 weather sites
  • Package Improvements report available in reporting menu
  • Inspections and measurements:
    • A list of dates is available in the wizard and edit screens to allow quick access to audit and package dates
    • Each inspection or measurement must be unique for a given date
  • Added Temperature Initiated Shower Flow Valves to Water Fixture Details. These are for reporting only and do not affect energy modeling.
  • Appliances can now be marked as ‘Exterior’ matching the behavior for lighting.
  • Use ASHRAE 62.2 based algorithm for converting from ACH to CFM50
  • Calculate and display building airflow standard in homeowner report
  • Default cooling latent load can be set in preferences
  • Updated defaults for ducted distribution systems
  • Updated defaults for DHW fixtures
  • Model and manufacturer can be collected on heating, cooling and DHW plants
  • Updated utility billing import spreadsheet
  • Added two typical pool pump appliances to appliance library
  • Model and manufacturer can be collected on appliances
  • Detailed data collection for pool pumps. Details are for reporting only and do not affect energy modeling.
  • Energy Savings Summary report
  • HPXML – New version 2.1 export with :
    • Improved surface insulation descriptions
    • BPI2400 Information
    • Window SHGC
    • Pool pumps
    • Fixed CFL lighting type
  • Health and safety now present on non-audit packages as well as audit. Health and safety measurements and inspections are associated with a package based on date.
  • Temperature initiated shower flow valves

 

HPXML Functionality

TREAT v 3.4 supports an all new data export feature. TREAT can now export data in the HPXML format. This growing national standard consists of hundreds of specific data fields that different state and national programs can select from, the end result being that your data can be used for cross boundary compliance in an expanding number of programs.

In addition to this manual, there is a searchable online knowledgebase that has many more usage and modeling tips.

 

Special Note:

Not finding the answers you’re looking for? Log a support ticket here.

An active TREAT license is required (license checker) for all support inquiries, when submitting a support ticket please be sure to include your license number in the body of your request. You can find your license number by opening TREAT, selecting registration, selecting manual offline registration, and copying the license number from there.


Introduction

Welcome to Targeted Retrofit Energy Analysis Tool (TREAT) v. 3.4!

TREAT is the premier energy modeling tool nationally certified by the Department of Energy for use in Weatherization Assistance Projects for ALL building classes. That’s single-family, as well as, low-rise, mid-rise, and high-rise multifamily applications. TREAT is also an approved program compliance tool for a number of statewide programs including NYSERDA’s Home Performance with Energy Star Program, NYSERDA’s Multifamily Performance Partners Program, Washington State’s Weatherization Assistance Program, and many more! Now featuring HPXML Data Outputs, TREAT is even more versatile than ever.

Welcome to the forefront of the energy modeling industry. TREAT’s use of the national standard HPXML means that your jobs are in compliance in even more regions than ever!

Program Capabilities

TREAT is an interactive program that allows its users to accomplish the following tasks:

  • Create a multi-zone energy model of single-family or multi-family buildings.
  • Calculate the monthly cost of each fuel used in the model for typical weather conditions.
  • Analyze improvements for the building and group these improvements in packages.
  • Account for interactions of improvements in the packages.
  • Calculate design heating and cooling loads for the model and each evaluated package of improvements.
  • Calculate projected energy savings from individual improvements and improvement packages in Btu and dollars.
  • Calculate payback, SIR (Savings to Investment Ratio), annual cash flow, and monthly cash flow for each improvement and package of improvements.
  • Present a work scope for a selected package of improvements, including basic cost estimation.
  • Print reports for customers that encourage investing in improvements, including information on building performance.
  • Print comparative sales reports showing the costs and savings of various tiers of workscopes
  • Analyze utility bills for multiple fuel types and meters in the building.
  • Estimate usage for missing utility bills.
  • Track energy use after an improvement package is installed.
  • Weather-normalize actual utility bills and calculate the base load (non-heating usage) for each fuel.
  • Calibrate the model to match calculated monthly energy usage to actual billing data.

Troubleshooting Microsoft Windows Accounts

Account restrictions on TPGX files:

When using non-administrative accounts the user may not be allowed to open, save or modify TPGX files created by users with administrative privileges. When using non-administrative accounts (limited accounts) the users will still be able to create new TPGX files. These files may be modified or saved as long as they have not been modified by an administrative-account user.

If you are unable to save a file created under a different type of user account, use “Save As” to save the file under new name.

Data recovery after a crash:

In the event that TREAT is not closed properly (due to a computer crash or TREAT crash) TREAT will present the user with two options for recovering the most recent TPGX. Upon opening TREAT again you will be presented with the Crash Recovery Screen.

Here you can choose to:

  1. Save “as-is”: This option allows the user to open the TPGX file that was open at the time of the crash. This option allows the user to save recovered data under a new name to avoid any further data corruption. This file can be used to log a ticket with the screen on your right, or you may continue working if you notice no file errors.
  2. Clear: This option will clear the temporary file associated with your last open TPGX file. The original file is unchanged from your last manual save.

Program Scope

Energy Model Description

  • A building is viewed as an aggregation of spaces (rooms). Spaces may be conditioned (heated and/or cooled) or unconditioned.
    • In TREAT Single Family: The maximum number of spaces allowed is 4
    • In TREAT Multifamily: The maximum number of spaces allowed is 100
  • Each space must have at least one surface (wall, ceiling, or floor). Only exterior surfaces and surfaces between heated and unheated spaces may be entered. The total number of surfaces in a project must not exceed 500. Up to 300 of them may be exterior surfaces (including exterior doors). There may be up to 100 unique wall constructions.
  • Each space may contain unlimited number of appliances and lighting and a ventilation fan.
  • Each exterior surface may contain multiple doors and windows. The total number of window records in the building must not exceed 500. A single window record may be used to describe multiple windows on the same wall by entering window quantity.
    • This is especially useful when modeling multiple windows that share the same wall or point in the same direction
  • Each wall may have a single overhang, to model shading. The overhang runs the full length of the wall, is located at the top of the wall and is a horizontal surface parallel to the ground.
  • The model building must have a heating system that may consist of up to two subsystems: main (primary) and backup (secondary). Each subsystem can have its own distribution system.
    • Back up heating is activated when the main heating capacity is exceeded.
  • The heating system can be connected to multiple thermostats (the building can have multiple heating zones).
  • Each heating/cooling zone may include any number of spaces (rooms).
  • The building may have a cooling system. The cooling system may share its distribution with a heating subsystem.
    • Heating and cooling systems share thermostats.
  • Each conditioned space must belong to one heating/cooling zone (controlled by one thermostat).
  • The leakage area of a heated space is distributed among its surfaces in proportion to the surface area.
  • If, in addition, the user assigns leakage area to surfaces, then only the remaining (unassigned) leakage is distributed among surfaces in proportion to the surface area.
  • Each project may contain a model of a single Base Building and unlimited number of improvement packages for that Base Building.
  • Fuel bills may be entered for the whole building or individually metered spaces.
  • The Project may include any number of individually metered spaces.
  • There may be only one rate for each fuel.
  • Each individually metered space may contain any number of utility bills for each fuel.
  • Utility bills for the same fuel and the same individually metered space must not overlap.
  • Both estimated and actual bills may be entered.
  • Billing analysis is performed for each fuel using utility bills for all individually metered spaces for the specified analysis period.
  • The Building may have both main and back up heating fuels.
  • If there are two heating fuels then the billing analysis is performed using the aggregated heating usage of both fuels; it is not calculated for each fuel individually.

Model Validation:

HERS BESTEST

TREAT complies with Home Energy Rating System Building Energy Simulation Test (HERS BESTEST). HERS BESTEST is a verification procedure developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to determine the accuracy and effectiveness of the energy load prediction capability of software tools. The validation methodology consists of comparative testing – in which results from software programs are compared to results from other software programs. The comparative approach includes both ‘sensitivity testing’ and ‘intermodal comparisons’. It uses a wide variety of building configurations and characteristics as test cases for the evaluation. The comparative procedure uses results from three widely-used and well- validated, detailed building energy simulation software programs to develop a range of reasonable results for each of the test cases. The reference programs used to generate the test case results are:

 

  1. BLAST 3.0, Level 215: Developed by the U.S. Department of Defense for use in analyzing energy efficiency improvements for their buildings.
  2. DOE2.1E-W54: At the time of HERS BESTEST Development, DOE2.1E was considered to be the most advanced of the programs sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and the technical basis for setting national building energy codes and standards in the United States.
  3. SERIRES/SUNCODE 5.7: SERIRES is a public domain program developed by NREL. SUNREL, the calculation engine behind the TREAT software, was developed as an upgrade to SERIRES.

The results from these three reference programs are then statistically analyzed to determine the 90% confidence interval for each set of test case results. These 90% confidence intervals establish the range of acceptable results for each test case. The National Association of State Energy Officers’ (NASEO) National Home Energy Rating Technical Guidelines and the Mortgage Industry’s National Accreditation Procedures for Home Energy Rating Systems require that home energy rating software tools “pass” each test for each building configuration that the rating system software intends to evaluate. HERS BESTEST procedures describe two ‘Tiers’ of software test cases – Tier 1 and Tier 2.

BESTEST Tier 1 tests consist of exercising the elements of a basic house with typical glazing and insulation. Specific Tier 1 tests are designed to test a program’s ability produce energy consumption and savings results as described below. BESTEST Tier 2 tests are more focused on testing a software program’s ability to guide passive solar design, and are not addressed in this document.

Note: Software is considered to ‘pass’ a HERS BESTEST Tier if it passes ALL tests included within the Tier.

TREAT BESTEST data

RESNET Accreditation

TREAT v 3.4 is RESNET Accredited as an Existing Homes Tax Credit Compliance Tool

Several of TREAT’s internal calculations have been improved and validated against the RESNET accreditation suite, which includes the following tests:

  1. HERS BESTEST Tier 1 Tests
  2. RESNET DHW Tests
  3. RESNET HVAC Tests
  4. RESNET DSE (Distribution System Effectiveness) Tests
  5. RESNET Heating and Cooling TestsL125A

 


 

 

Installation

Requirements

  • Operating Systems: Windows XP/VISTA/7 on PC or in a virtual machine like Parallels on Mac or VirtualBox on Linux
  • Disk space: the total required hard drive space is 3 GB on C: drive

Procedure

If you are a Registered TREAT User with a previous version installed, store a copy of your current TREAT license number in a secure location.

  1. Open TREAT.
  2. Go to Registration.
  3. Copy and Paste your TREAT license number into a file.
  4. Save this file to My Documents or to your Desktop You will need this license number if you ever wish to transfer TREAT.
  5. You may wish to make regular backups of your TPGX file directory as well.

Download the TREAT Installation File

  1. Visit www.TreatSoftware.com and fill out the download form to be directed to the TREAT version 3.4 download.
  2. Save the download to an appropriate location on your computer.

Install TREAT

  1. Close all running programs on your computer.
  2. Double click the downloaded file to initiate the automatic installation process.
  3. Read the Release Notes or README file for pertinent information on the new version.
Note: TREAT v 3.4 files are NOT backward compatible with versions of TREAT older than TREAT 3.3.1. In order to open a 3.4 version TPGX file, the minimum version of TREAT required is v 3.3.1.

 


 

 

TREAT Project Groups (TPGX Files)

The options discussed below are all accessible in the TREAT Project Group drop down menu.

Creating, Opening, and Saving Project Groups and Templates

New:

This option creates a new project group (TPGX) with no projects defined.

Open -> Project Group:

This option opens an existing TPGX file from your computer

Open -> Edit Template:

This option opens a Project Group Template (PGTX) file. Templates allow you to pre-set many fields the way that you like them to have them ready for creating a new TPGX.

Open Most Recent:

This option opens the last TPGX file that the opened on this machine. The F3 function key is a convenient way to return to what you were last working on.

Recent Groups:

This sub-menu contains up to eight TPGX file names, representing the eight most recent TPGX files opened on this computer. The first file in the list is the most recently opened one.

Save:

Allows storing all changes to the current TPGX group (not only the selected project within the TPGX) to the TPGX file. When working with a TPGX the actual work is done over a temporary copy of the TPGX. This approach protects the original file from any corruption and data loss. Frequent use of Save while working on a project will significantly decrease the risk of lost data from system crashes.

Note: TREAT Temporary files can be used to recover work in the event that TREAT unexpectedly crashes. Temporary files are never a substitute for saving work periodically and cannot be used to recover work if the user closes TREAT.

 

Save As -> Project Group:

Saves changes to the currently active project group under a new name as a TPGX file. After the TPGX is saved under the new name, it becomes the currently active TPGX. (It is opened in TREAT.) Just like other software tools, saving as creates a new file. This option is useful for making modeling or improvement changes without making changes to the original TPGX.

Save As -> Template:

Saves changes to the currently active project group under a new name as a PGTX (Project Group Template) file. This works the same way as saving as a TPGX (TREAT Project Group) file, as described above. Files saved as Project Group Template files (PGTX) will be visible in the file selection dialog, but not in the Open Project Group screen.

Edit Description:

Presents the user with a screen to enter a description and/or any notes for the project group that is being saved.

Store Editable Libraries:

Allows the user to select which editable libraries from the currently active TPGX should be stored to the internal library depository for use with the other TPGX files.

The following editable libraries may be selected: Contractor, Customer, Daily Weather Data, User and Utility Rates. The depository can store only one copy of each library for future copying to other projects.

The Store Editable Libraries option is enabled when a TPGX is opened. No changes are made to the libraries in the open project when the Store Editable Libraries option is used. Which Editable Library is updated in each new TPGX is specified in the Project Group -> Options dialog.

 


Preferences

The Preferences tool serves the following purposes:

  • It allows the user to customize many of TREAT’s defaults. For example, the user can set custom heating and cooling season dates to be used for every newly created project instead of standard TREAT dates.
  • It allows the user to automatically fill in the inputs that are likely the same for every project. For example, the user can define fuels to be automatically generated for every new project at the time the project is created, eliminating the need to fill in the TREAT Fuels/Rates screen. The user can also specify a long-term and daily weather site to be used for each new project. A wide range of other inputs can be set through Preferences.
  • It allows the user to specify lighting and appliances to be generated at the time a new space is created. This feature is useful for users who do not collect lighting and appliance information on site. Automatic generation of lighting and appliances saves time and allows the user to account for interaction between base load and heating/cooling.
  • Preferences data is used to supply inputs for several other tools such as the New Building Wizard, Visual Inspection Wizard and Measurements Wizard. See description of these tools for more details.
  • It helps to speed up inputs on Surfaces and Windows screen by specifying the list of typical constructions to be shown in the Description combo boxes. This often eliminates the need to look for the surface in TREAT libraries.

TREAT comes with a default set of preferences. You may customize these defaults by modifying and saving input on Preferences screens. All project inputs generated by Preferences can be modified later using regular TREAT screens, just as any other inputs.

Project Group -> Preferences dialog presents these options:

  • Fuel/Rates tab: Up to four fuels can be selected. They will be automatically included in each project and will be available for selection as heating or hot water fuel in the New Building Wizard.
  • Weather/Defaults tab: Weather sites, heating and cooling seasons, and other inputs that appear on the Weather/Defaults input screen can be selected to be automatically included in each new project.
  • Surface Constructions tab: Up to 20 frequently used surfaces from the Surfaces Library can be selected. They will appear in the drop-down lists on the Surfaces screen, Surface Insulation Improvement Wizard, and New Building Wizard. One surface can be selected to appear at the top of the list; the rest of the list will be sorted according to the sort order selected.
  • Windows tab: Up to five frequently used glazings and frames can be selected. They will appear in the drop-down lists on the Windows screen, Window Replacement Improvement Wizard, and New Building Wizard. One of each can be selected to appear at the top of the lists.
  • Lighting/Appliances tab: There are seven sub-tabs for different types of spaces, these include:
  • Whole building
  • Living Space
  • Sleeping Quarters
  • Office Area
  • Other Heated Area
  • Unheated High ACH
  • Unheated Low ACH

The types of spaces correspond to the selections on the TREAT Spaces screen. For each type of space, there is an option to automatically add lighting or appliances when the space is created. For each type of space, lighting inputs of Typical Watts per Fixture, Hours On/Day and Average Wh/SqFt-Day can be specified. For each type of space, up to 10 appliances can be selected from the Appliance Library.

  • Inspections tab: Up to 10 inspections can be selected to be included in the Inspections Wizard. The Inspections Wizard is accessible from the Inspections screen and quickly creates inspection records of the types specified.
  • Measurements tab: Up to 10 measurements can be selected to be included in the Measurements Wizard. The Measurements Wizard is accessible from the Measurements screen and quickly creates measurement records of the types specified.

Reset to Default button:

This will clear all preferences that the user has selected and restore the default preferences that are included with TREAT.

Next button:

This scrolls through the tabs on the Preferences screen.

Save and Close button:

This saves changes and closes the screen.

Cancel and Close button:

This closes the screen but does not save any changes made since the last time the screen was opened.

 


Options:

This opens a screen that has three tabs.

General tab:

This tab allows a user to select whether the Model Inspector will be shown each time calculations are completed. The Model Inspector may also be started by clicking Tools > Model Inspector on the main menu.

Library Updates tab:

This tab allows the user to select their preferences for managing TREATs two distinct library types: Non-Editable and Editable. Non-Editable Libraries should be updated by default to take advantage of the new appliances, surfaces, etc. that are added to the libraries periodically.

Inputs in the Editable Libraries area allow selecting editable libraries that will be updated with editable data set on your machine when a TPGX file is opened. These may include contractor data, customer information, specific workscopes, etc. This functionality should be used with caution, because it allows overwriting the libraries stored in the existing TPGX file with new ones, which may cause data consistency problems, if the file is again open by previous users of the TPGX.

Note: Once a user adds information in one of the editable libraries, you must select Project Group -> Store Editable Libraries -> [Select which libraries to update] and then click Store. These options will now be available in the corresponding dropdown menus whenever a new project is started. These options will also become available for selection in older Project Groups as well.

After you import daily weather data into a TPGX, you may want to update the libraries for other TPGX files with the latest weather data. This may be done as follows:

  • Select Project Group -> Store Editable Libraries menu option and click OK to Daily Weather Library upgrade. The Daily Weather Library will be stored to the central library depository.
  • Open Project Groups -> Options window. In the Editable Libraries area select Prompt to Upgrade Libraries and select Daily Weather Data checkbox.
  • Click Save to save the new inputs and close the window.

After that, each time you open a TPGX, the selected editable libraries will be replaced with the versions of these libraries stored on your computer.

Warning:

Use caution when upgrading editable libraries — especially the Contractor, Customer and User libraries — to prevent data loss or inconsistency in project data. For example, you may have a project in ProjectGroup1.tpgx that has customer John Smith, who is customer #3 in the Customer library. While working on ProjectGroup2.tpgx, you choose to store its Customer library to the internal library depository. In that version of the library, customer #3 is Tom Brown. If you replace the Customer library in ProjectGroup1 with the Customer library from ProjectGroup2 using the TREAT library upgrade feature, then all projects in ProjectGroup1 that referenced John Smith will now have Tom Brown as a customer. Information for John Smith will be lost.


Other TREAT Toolbar Selections:

This section contains a brief description of the available toolbars located on the very top of the TREAT interface.

TREAT Project Toolbar:

Use this toolbar to open existing projects or create a new project within a specific Project Group. These options can be used if you are submitting multiple models under the same program.

Reports tab:

Use the Reports tab to select from several default report styles. You can also select a default output type (PDF, Word, etc.).

Selecting Contractor Data allows you to upload a logo to be included in your reports. You can also input other information about your company to be included in reports. Contractor Data is also available through the libraries tab on the TREAT toolbar.

Tools:

This menu contains a number of tools to assist you in creating your model. Options include a Combustion Air Calculator, the Input Billing Data tool, a Daily Weather Data Import, the TREAT Model Inspector, and finally an option to Rotate the Building.

Help:

The help drop down can send you to specific help pages for the corresponding screen of TREAT you are currently viewing. The option to Ask TREAT Support brings you to our ticketing systems to log a customer support ticket.

Note: An active support license is required to receive customer support, when logging a ticket please be sure to include your license number so that staff can verify an active support license.

Interface Components

This section will describe the main components of the TREAT interface. The main screen of the program is split into three sections: Project Index, Input Panel/Main Screen and Feeback Panel.

Project Index:

The leftmost section in your TREAT software is called the Project Index. It contains the titles of all the main input screens. Click on the title to navigate to the desired screen. Screen titles are disabled and shown in light gray when no project is open. Open an existing project or start a new one from the TREAT Main Menu to enable navigation.

The input screens are grouped in six sections: General Information, Billing Data, Building Model, Building Inspection, Evaluated Options, and Reporting. Section titles are in black font and are for reference, not navigation.

Within each input group you will see a number of screen options to help guide you in building your model. Models should be built starting from the top of the Project Index and moving down.

Blue Screen Titles are those that have not been opened in the currently opened TPGX

Red Screen Titles show the currently selected screen

Brown Screen Titles show screens you have already opened

Green Check Marks show that you have successfully saved inputs on that screen.

Note: Checkmarks do not necessarily mean that an input is complete. Remember the user is responsible for verifying that inputs are complete and accurate.

Input Panel/Main Screen:

The central section of the screen is called the Input Panel. The Input Panel holds the current input screen. The screen title is displayed in the upper right corner.

On most screens the input is presented in a table. If the column title has an asterisk (*) next to it, then the input is required in order for the data to be saved. A purple question mark (?) next to the input or title indicates that there is a context-sensitive help statement available for this item. Position the mouse over the question mark to view the statement. New inputs are typed in the first row of the table just below the headings. This row is called the Input Line. The white cells of the Input Line allow the user to type the input or select it from the drop down box. Click on light gray Input Line cells to open the corresponding library and select the desired input. Enter information left to right or top to bottom, depending on the screen layout.

In many cases the program fills out the Input Line with default values to expedite the data entry. These values are either generated based on your previous inputs or represent the typical case.

Note: It is your responsibility to verify that the values are correct and edit them as needed.

Clicking Apply checks that the new record entered in the Input Line is complete and moves it to the lower part of the table. The Input Line is then cleared and ready for a new input. To delete a record, select it in the table and click Delete. To edit a record, select it in the table (which moves it to the Input Line). Make changes and click Apply to save the record and clear the Input Line. Clicking Clear clears all the inputs from the Input Area and reverts the screen to the state it was in after the most recent Apply or Delete operation.

Copy and Paste are available on some input screens. The functionality of the buttons is similar to the capabilities offered by many Windows software tools. Copy saves the currently selected record to the TREAT clipboard. Paste adds the record to the current input screen. Only one object of each type (one window, one surface) may be copied for pasting.

Feedback Panel:

The Feedback Panel occupies the lower right portion of the screen. It contains the summary of calculation Results. Calculation results for the energy model of the existing building without improvements (the “Base Building“) are shown on the Building Model row of the table. Calculation results for billing analysis for the analysis period that is compared to the Base Building are shown on the Billing Data row of the table.

Click the Calculate Model button to calculate energy consumption of the Base Building model. Before running the calculations, TREAT verifies that the model inputs are consistent. A detailed message appears if a problem is found with the inputs. Depending on the severity of the problem you may choose to ignore the warning or correct the input. Some of the problems must be corrected before the calculations can proceed.

Note: The model must be calculated before you can run billing analysis reports or any improvement package reports.

Click Calculate Billing to run a billing analysis for the analysis period that is compared to the Base Building. The button is disabled if there is no such analysis period in the project. The Calculate Model and Calculate Billing functions each require completion of specific inputs before they can be used.

Note: Each time the essential inputs for the Base Building are modified, the corresponding portion of the Feedback Panel is cleared because calculation results are no longer up-to-date.

The Feedback Panel shows usage in units of fuel for each fuel specified on the Fuels/Rates screen. Use the scroll bar in the upper right corner of the Feedback Panel to view more fuels if there are more than three fuels in the project. The detailed breakdown of fuel cost by end use can be viewed in the Model Energy Report in the Reports section. The Feedback Panel also shows the Heating Reference Temperature and Heating Slope for the model and billing.

Remember:

  • Calculate Model and Calculate Billing do not re-run the calculations if the corresponding row of the Feedback Panel is filled with the calculation results. In this case TREAT displays the previously calculated outputs. New calculations are performed only if the output row is not filled out.
  • When TREAT is used to perform a billing data analysis only, no information is displayed on the Feedback Panel.
  • True-Up Help brings up a window with tips on how to match outputs from the Base Building model to the billing data.
  • Billing and model fuel usage is for the entire calendar year. Thirty-year average weather data for the long-term weather site specified on the Weather/Defaults screen is used to estimate annual Heating Degree Days and Cooling Degree Days for both model and billing.

Heating reference temperature (balance point temperature)[F]:

The outdoor temperature at which for the user specified value of the interior temperature the total heat loss is equal to the heat gain from sun, occupants, lighting, appliances, etc. Heating reference temperature is almost always lower than the thermostat set point due to internal gains from occupants, lighting and appliances. The model reference temperature is always used for the analysis period that is compared to the model.

The main factors that influence the reference temperature are internal heat gain (the amount of heat produced by sources other than the heating system) and the building heat loss rate (how fast the building loses this heat).

Example:

Building A is a new building, very well sealed and insulated, with a very efficient heating system. Building B is poorly insulated, with leaky windows and an inefficient heating system. Heating thermostats are set to the same temperature. If there are no heat gain from appliances, lighting, occupants, or sun (no internal heat gains) then the reference temperature for both buildings is equal to the thermostat set point. However, if there is equal internal heat gain in both buildings, then building A will have lower reference temperature because the heat produced by appliances, lighting, etc. in the building will keep the building warm at a lower outdoor temperature.

Heating Slope:

Measured in Btu/F-day-sq.ft., is the heating energy consumption per degree of temperature difference between the reference temperature and the outdoor temperature normalized by the building area. Heating slope characterizes the building heat loss rate to ambient and ground due to infiltration, ventilation, and through walls, roof, windows and floors. It also accounts for the overall heating system efficiency, including heating distribution. Heating Degree Days is the sum of positive differences between reference temperature and outdoor temperature for the heating season.


Billing Analysis

TREAT allows calculating average non-HVAC (base) load and heating slope (building heat loss rate) by analyzing utility bills with daily outdoor temperatures during the billing periods. You may choose to obtain utility bills and run billing analysis before going to a site visit to get a better idea about the energy performance of the building. Billing analysis is also a valuable tool for validating the building energy model by comparing the modeled results to actual billing information.

As with any statistical calculations, it is important to have large amount of reliable billing data available in order to get meaningful results. We recommend that you have at least twelve actual utility bills available for each analyzed fuel. If a fuel is used for both base and HVAC load, then the bills must be available for the months without noticeable heating and/or cooling.

Note: You do not have to create a building energy model to run billing analysis. Use the Run Billing Analysis button on the Analysis Periods screen to run calculations for the analysis periods that are not compared to the model. The Heating Energy Scorecard and the Investment Guidelines reports show the results of billing analysis performed independently of the model. The Heating Energy Scorecard report demonstrates how your building performs relative to other typical buildings. The Investment Guidelines for heating report calculates cost effective investment for specified target heating energy consumption and payback.

TREAT normalizes billing data based on the calculated heating and cooling degree days per time period, it does not perform regression analysis of the bills. The user has to specify heating and cooling reference temperatures if billing analysis is run independently from the building model; in TREAT v 3.4 a reference temperature of 65° F is available. In this case the accuracy of the billing analysis strongly depends on the reliability of the assumptions.

To run billing analysis, fill out the screens in the Billing Data section. Skip the Metered Spaces screen for projects where usage of each fuel is measured by a single meter. See the Billing Data section for more details.


Energy Model

The energy model allows calculating building energy usage and predicts the impact of improvements to various building components on the building energy consumption. To create an energy model you must describe the building on the screens of Building Model section. Complete the inputs on the Spaces, Walls/Surfaces, Heating/Cooling and Thermostat screens before attempting to run any model calculations.

Once you’ve described your building, click Calculate Model on the Feedback Panel. It is helpful to run calculations periodically as you work on the project inputs. Check the Feedback Panel and Model Energy Report to make sure that outputs change as you expect. This should allow you to catch and fix any input inaccuracy early.

  • Once you start working on a section, you should fill out the screens in the order they are listed on the Project Index.For example, you must complete input on the Spaces screen before entering data on the Walls/Surfaces screen.
  • However, some input screens may be skipped entirely.For example, you do not have to enter data on the Exterior Doors, Windows, Infiltration, Fans, Hot Water, Lighting, Appliances and Load Sizing screens in order to run the model calculations. On the other hand, incomplete input will affect the accuracy of your results. See information on each section for more details.
  • Existing inputs can be accessed and edited in any order by navigating to the screen where the inputs were made.
  • In general, the creation of a building model requires the use of several assumptions. Calculating your building model is the perfect time to make sure that your assumptions were reasonable.

Follow the procedure below to help ensure that the assumptions for your Base Model are reasonable:

  • Run the Model Inspectorby clicking Tools -> Model Inspector on the main menu.The Model Inspector examines the data that has been entered for the base building and improvement packages to catch common data input errors. The verifications are general rules designed to check that the input data has a minimum level of consistency with a logical building model and with TREAT calculation algorithms. Review the warnings on every tab of Model Inspector and modify project inputs as needed.
  • Check the Feedback Panel to see if the heating, cooling and base load calculated for the model is close to the billing numbers (if billing analysis was performed).
  • Click the True-Up Help button for advice on how to reconcile the model and billing outputs.
  • Review Design Heating and Cooling Loads Report to see that the load is distributed between the spaces as you would expect.
  • Review the Model Energy Report to see that the building energy consumption and losses due to the different factors are reasonable.
Note: The model review can also provide valuable insight into what improvements should be proposed. The Evaluated Options section may only be used after the Building Model screens are filled out. Use the screens in this section to evaluate the effect of improvements on annual energy costs. You can run the Model Inspector for every package that you create.

Remember: The predicted savings are only as valid as the model of the Base Building.

The Building Inspection screens may be used to document results of visual inspections and measurements that were performed during the site visit. Inputs on these screens will not affect energy consumption of the model. If you are creating an energy model, it is wise to limit the inputs on the Building Inspection screens to items that do not influence energy consumption or may not be entered on the Building Model screens. If you do not plan to create an energy model for the building, then use the Building Inspection screens to enter all your measurements and observations.


Libraries

Libraries in TREAT are shared by all the projects that you create. TREAT has two types of libraries – editable and non-editable.

You can find the libraries that describe the basic information for your model by using the TREAT toolbar and selecting Libraries, Then select from the dropdown window. Most of these libraries have searchable filters. Once you have found the specific input you are searching for simply double click your selection to add it to your current TPGX. Be sure to click Apply in the bottom of the library window.

Editable Libraries:

TREAT has the following editable libraries:

  • Daily Weather Data
  • Fuel Rate
  • Customer
  • User
  • Contractor
  • Workscope

These libraries can be accessed from the Main Menu by selecting Library and then the name of the library. There are shortcuts to the libraries from input screens where the library data is used. Any changes to the User, Customer, Contractor and Daily Weather Data libraries affect both future and existing projects. Changes made to the Fuel Rate Library affect future projects only.

Non-Editable Libraries:

TREAT has the following non-editable libraries:

  • Fuels
  • Surfaces
  • Doors
  • Glazing
  • Window Frames
  • Lighting
  • Appliances
  • Heating Systems
  • Cooling Systems
  • Domestic Hot Water Systems

These libraries can be accessed from the input screens for building your base model only when a corresponding component is being input or edited. Records in the Surface Library are sorted by R-value. Records in the Appliance Library are sorted by appliance type.

The library entries for Lighting, Appliances, Heating, Cooling, and Domestic Hot Water can be edited for the current project once the entry has been selected and is shown in the input line of the appropriate Building Model screen. The libraries for Windows, Walls and Doors cannot be edited for the current building, as the databases for these libraries contain additional information beyond the information shown.

Note: Use the Custom Properties button to alter the U-Value and SHGC of selected Window in your base model.

Starting a Project

After a TPGX is open, you have several options to get to work on a modeling project:

Open Project:

Opens a selected project in the TPGX.

New Project:

Start a new project. A dialog box allows you to create a project with defaults as specified in your Preferences file, or you can select the New Building Wizard. This option will save time by automatically creating the spaces, surfaces, windows, lighting, and appliances in the building.

Note: The New Building Wizard is not recommended for use in Multifamily projects due to the complexity of those models.

 

Import Project:

Create a new project populated with the data from a TREAT xml import file. If your input file has just the basic administrative and billing data, select New Building Wizard, to get right to work entering modelling data. Choose Create Blank Project if you want to override default project data, such as Number of Bedrooms, etc. with data from an external source.

Note: The new project or any changes to an existing project will not be permanently saved to the TPGX file until you click Project Group -> Save on the main menu or press F2.

Creating a Project using the New Building Wizard:

The New Building Wizard provides a quick and easy way to create a building with up to three conditioned spaces, a foundation space (basement or crawlspace), and an attic. The New Building Wizard can be accessed by clicking Project Group -> New -> Blank Project Group. Then in the Main Screen select New -> Start New Building Wizard.

New Building Wizard: Step 1(General)

Step 1 contains information related to the general building description. Some inputs are similar to the ones entered on the TREAT main screens. Other inputs are used only in the wizard and determine the content of the following wizard steps and the way a building is created after the wizard is completed.

  • Number of Stories: determines the number of conditioned spaces generated by the wizard. TREAT will create a separate conditioned space for each floor of the building. You will be asked to describe the shape and dimensions of each space on the following screens of the wizard.
    • If Foundation is set to any type of basement or crawlspace, then the wizard will create the corresponding foundation space.
    • Infiltration of the foundation space is set in accordance with TREAT defaults for vented and unvented spaces. Basement ceiling height is assumed to be 7 ft. Crawlspace ceiling height is assumed to be 4 ft.
  • Number of Bedrooms: This input is used to help TREAT determine the number of living spaces
  • Number of Occupants: This input helps TREAT estimate certain water and electricity usages
  • Foundation Depth Below Grade input is available if the foundation type is basement or crawlspace. Enter the average depth of the foundation floor below grade in this field.

Example:

If the Basement Foundation Depth Below Grade is set to 4 ft., then each basement wall will be described as two wall sections in the TREAT project. One section will be 4 ft. high and adjacent to ground; the other will be 3 ft. high (basement ceiling height of 7 ft. minus foundation depth of 4 ft.) and adjacent to outdoors. If foundation depth is greater than the default ceiling height for the space, then TREAT will assume that ceiling height of the space is equal to the foundation depth and only the below-grade portion of the wall will be generated. That would correspond to a space that is entirely below grade.

  • Air Leakage: Can be input as ACH or CFM50
  • Shielding Class: used to determine amount of solar radiation absorbed by the spaces
  • Fuels: this input selects the fuels for heat and hot water from a list. Fuels can be added to the list by canceling the New Building Wizard, clicking Project Group > Preferences on the main menu at the top of the TREAT screen, selecting the fuel on the Fuels/Rates tab, and clicking Save and Close on the Preferences screen.

New Building Wizard: Step 2 (Surface Construction):

The Surface Construction input allows you to specify the construction of walls, floors, and ceilings in the building. Construction can be selected from the list or from the TREAT library. To access the TREAT library, select library at the end of the list. The selected surface constructions are used to generate the surfaces in the building after the wizard is completed.

 

Note: Surface construction is set to NA, and input is disabled if your building does not have any surfaces of that type.

New Building Wizard: Step 3(Geometry):

  • Enter the geometry for each floor of the building. If you have entered that your building has three stories in Step 1, you will be able to enter three spaces in Step 3. Spaces may have different ceiling heights and are assumed to be stacked one above the other starting from the foundation space (if a foundation was selected).
  • Elevation of the first floor space is equal to the ceiling height of the foundation space (if any). Ceiling height is used by the wizard to generate the height of walls in this space. It is also used as the set point for the elevation of the ceiling for this space and to calculate the elevation of spaces above this space.

Example:

If the ceiling height of the first floor is set to 8 ft. then the first-floor ceiling height on the TREAT Spaces screen will be 8 ft., the height of each wall generated for this space and shown on the Surfaces screen will be 8 ft., the elevation of the ceiling for this space will be 8 ft., and the elevation of the second floor (if any) will be equal to the elevation of the first floor plus 8 ft.

Remember: Spaces may have different footprints.

The wizard may be used to describe a cape-style house where the second floor is smaller and of a different shape than the first floor. In this situation you may need to enter some of the roof section above the first floor on TREAT main screens after the wizard is completed. The footprint of the foundation is assumed to be the same as the footprint of the first floor. The footprint of the attic is assumed to be the same as the footprint of the top floor.

  • Enter dimensions for each wall shown on the sketch of the selected footprint.
  • Enter the number of windows on each wall.
  • Select the exposure of the building by using the drop-down list to select the direction represented by the arrow on the sketch.
    • The Next button allows you to enter data for the next space. If you have already entered data for all the spaces, it opens the next step of the wizard.

New Building Wizard: Step 4(Floor Details):

Step 4 of the Wizard completes the description of the building.

  • Space Type selection is used on the TREAT Spaces screen. The space type determines the default lighting and appliances that are generated for this space once the wizard is completed. The lighting and appliances that may be generated for each space type are specified on the corresponding tab of the Preferences screen, accessible by clicking Project Group –> Preferences on the main menu at the top of the TREAT screen.
Note: If there is more than one living space, then Generate Typical Appliances should only be checked for one of the living spaces, unless duplicates of typical appliances are desired, for example, in a two-family house.

 

After the New Building Wizard is completed, there are a few more details to enter on the regular TREAT input screens.

  • Complete the Heating/Cooling screen.
  • Enter cooling Thermostat Set Points on the Thermostats screen if there is cooling in the building
  • Enter Domestic Hot Water information on the Hot Water screen.

The base building model energy consumption may now be calculated.

Creating a New Project using the Input Screens:

Clicking Create Blank Project on the Start New Project screen will start a new blank project. All project data can be entered using the input screens.

Opening an Existing Project:

To open an existing project select Project > Open Project from the main menu, or, using the Input Panel, double click the project you want to open or highlight the project name and click Open. The existing projects may be sorted in alphabetical order by any column. To sort projects, select the sorting criteria in the drop down box below the table (titled “Sort Projects By”).


General Information Screens

Start the project by filling out the General Information screens: Project Description, Fuels/Rates, and Weather/Defaults. These screens contain information that is used for all the other sections.

Project Description:

Information entered on the Project Description screen is used only for reports, record keeping and defaults for inputs on other screens. It does not have any effect on calculations. You may skip this screen entirely if report appearance is not important for the project. New/Edit button in the Customer and User areas opens Customer and User libraries respectively. If the customer name and address are the same as the contact person name and the building address, you may use the Same as Contact Person/Building Address button in the Customer area of the screen to copy the information automatically. This situation is very typical for single family houses.

Fuels/Rates:

All fuels that are used in the building, or that will be used in the improvements, must be entered on the Fuels/Rates screen. This input is essential for both the Billing Analysis and the Energy Model. You may enter only one rate for each fuel in the project. Enter a usage-weighted fuel cost if you have multiple rates for the same fuel.

  • Fuel: click the leftmost light gray box to open the Fuel Library. Highlight the fuel in the library and click select or double click the fuel to copy it to the input screen.
  • Utility Company and Rate Name are required only if you want to save the fuel rate to the Fuel Rate Library so that you can use it in future.
  • Monthly Flat Fee is the fixed amount that is charged monthly by the utility company in addition to per unit of fuel cost.
Note: that if you have multiple meters for the same fuel you need to enter the total amount for all meters. For example, if there are ten electric meters in an apartment building and each meter has a monthly service charge of $12 you need to enter $120 monthly flat fee. This input is important when model data is compared to billing data.
  • Energy Unit depends on the fuel that you have selected. No custom units are allowed in this field. Btu/Unit is fuel-specific and is used to calculate fuel consumption. TREAT provides a default value and verifies that the input is reasonable for the specified fuel before the data is saved. The user should obtain an accurate value from the fuel vendor.

Energy Units in TREAT:

The Btu content of wood fuel may vary significantly depending on the amount of wood in the cord and the moisture content of the wood. A cord is an approximate unit of measurement representing a pile of logs 4′ × 4′ × 8′, containing air spaces and bark. Rather than being 128 cubic feet of solid wood, a cord may contain as little as 85 cubic feet of wood. The energy content of wood is very dependent on its moisture content. The number in the Fuel Library are for wood with 20% moisture content, a condition achieved by splitting the logs into pieces no more than 8″ wide and allowing the wood to dry with sun exposure and air circulation from the wind for one year. The energy content of wood decreases by one percent for each one percent increase in moisture.

The energy content per Mlbs (1,000 pounds) of steam depends on the pressure of the steam. A utility company may guarantee a system-wide minimum pressure and available pressure may vary at different points in the distribution system. The Btu content of steam generated by a public utility presented in the Fuel Library is for steam at 150 psi gauge pressure, but this assumption must be verified for each specific steam customer.

Energy Cost is the cost of the fuel in dollars per unit of fuel. TREAT only supports one fixed cost per fuel. If the fuel cost depends on total consumption or demand, enter an average value. If utility bills are available, the average cost may be calculated as the ratio of total energy cost (excluding flat monthly fee entered separately) to total energy usage from all available bills. You may further adjust this input after the average cost of fuel is calculated as part of the billing analysis. Energy cost is important because it is used to calculate dollar savings from improvements, as well as improvement SIR, payback and cash flow.

You may enter a fuel by copying it from Rate Library into the current project. Click the View Rate Library button, highlight a rate in the library and click Select to close the rate library and copy the record to the Input Line of the Fuels/Rates screen.

Weather/Defaults

The information on this screen is required for both billing analysis and energy modeling.

Daily Weather Site is used to weather-normalize billing analysis. Select the location closest to your building from the list of sites that you have entered in the Daily Weather Data library.

Importing Daily Weather Data:

TREAT Provides 2 Options for utilizing the most current daily weather data.

  • TREAT 3.4.6 and above has an updated Daily Weather Spreadsheet tool that allows users to select from over 2000 additional weather sites! It can be accessed by opening the Import wizard on the daily weather tool upload section.
  • TREAT allows users to download the most current daily weather data directly into TREAT. As long as you are connected to the internet simply click Daily Weather Data Library. In the next menu under “locations” select Import.
  • If you wish to download a specific data set or city, you may Import a Daily Weather File using this option and a file saved to your computer.

Long Term Weather Site:

This input is essential for both billing and energy model sections. Select the location closest to your building from the list of sites supported by TREAT. Your selection will direct the program to the appropriate weather file that contains information on typical climatic conditions for every hour of the year. The file is generated based on hourly meteorological data collected for the 30-year period. 12 typical months for each station were chosen from statistics determined by using five elements: global horizontal radiation, direct normal radiation, dry bulb temperature, dew point temperature, and wind speed. TMY3 type weather data is preferred as it provides more sites of more current data. TMY2 sites remain as an option to match older TPGs.

Note:  If you are using TREAT versions after 3.1, but are frequently sharing files with users on earlier versions of TREAT, you will want to select a TMY2 file type.

Heating Season and Cooling Season:

This input determines the months during which heating and cooling systems are available. Heating energy usage during the months that are not part of heating season is equal to zero, even if there is non-zero heating load during these months. TREAT assumes that heating starts on the first day of the heating season start month and ends on the last day of the heating season end month. The same rule applies to cooling.

A PDF containing heating and cooling season months for various locations in the US is available by clicking this link

Heating and Cooling Season:

This input affects both model and billing calculations. Heating and cooling seasons may overlap, for example you may specify heating and cooling season from January to December. Some months may belong to neither heating nor cooling season. Heating season input also affects the way natural ventilation is calculated. See Building Model section Spaces input for more details.

Energy Model Calculation Mode:

This box allows selecting the algorithms used for energy analysis. You may select one of the two available Surface Conductance Algorithms:

  1. R-value +heat capacity for heavy walls algorithm:  this is the optimized version of our previous “layer-by-layer”mode.R-value + heat capacity explained:The algorithm evaluates the material layers in each surface in the project and models each layer either as pure thermal resistance or as thermal mass, depending on layer thickness and material properties. Thermal mass characterizes the ability of material to store significant amounts of thermal energy and delay heat transfer through a building component. This delay leads to several important results, such as lower energy consumption and moving energy demand to off-peak periods. The effect of thermal mass is most noticeable in climates with large daily temperature fluctuations. In heating-dominated climates thermal mass may be used effectively to collect and store solar gains.
    Note: TREAT Home Energy Rating System Building Energy Simulation Test (HERS BESTEST) testing was performed in this mode.
  2. Pure Resistances (R-values): this algorithm does not account for the influence of thermal mass.Pure Resistances explainedThis mode was referred to as “Minimize Calculation Time” mode in the versions prior to TREAT 2.5. The mode is retained in order to support projects that were created with the older versions. It is not recommended for new projects since the R-value + heat capacity for heavy walls algorithm provides more accurate results and comparable calculation speed.

Note: R-value + heat capacity for heavy walls mode is the default mode for all projects created in TREAT 2.5 or later. For all projects created in the prior TREAT versions calculation mode is set to pure resistance.

The following Infiltration Algorithms are available:

  1.  Surface Leakage Proportional to Area (Detailed Infiltration) algorithm converts the input entered on Infiltration screen to the total effective air leakage area (ELA).
    1.  ELA is allocated to exterior surfaces entered on Walls/Surfaces screen in proportion with the gross surface area. This algorithm accounts for influence of indoor/outdoor temperature difference, elevation of spaces and surfaces and stack effect. The energy calculations may run slower in this mode. The outputs of the algorithm depend strongly on the shape of the building.

Example:

A single story building roof/ceiling may have larger surface area than exterior walls. Because of that, most of the effective air leakage area will be allocated to roof/ceiling, which may result in exaggerated stack effect. Users may adjust the default air leakage assumptions by assigning leakage areas between specific spaces and the outdoors. Fixed Infiltration Rate algorithm assumes that the infiltration rate is unchanged throughout the year and is equal to the value specified on Infiltration screen. The mode increases calculation speed but does not account for indoor/outdoor temperature difference and stack effect. The accuracy of TREAT calculations in this mode was verified by HERS BESTEST.

Note: Use Surface Leakage Proportional to Area algorithm for high-rise building, where the stack effect plays important role. For low-rise buildings, Fixed Infiltration Rate algorithm is recommended.

Default Values:

Selecting from predefined Default Values on the right-hand side of the Weather/Default screen allows the user to speed up the data entry for the energy model. The default value applies only to the components that are created after the default is set. For example, changing the default wall constructions will not affect walls that are already entered in the project, but each new wall created after the default was set would have the new default construction.

  • Default Wall Construction:Wall construction selected on this screen is by default assigned to each new wall that is created on Surfaces/Walls screen. The default value may be edited for each wall on Surfaces/Walls screen.
  • Default Window Frame Type and Glazing Type:Window frame/glazing that you select on this screen will, by default, be assigned to each new window entered on the Windows screen.
  • Default Door Type:The door type that you select on this screen will, by default, be assigned to each new door created on the Doors screen.
  • Default Ceiling Height:The value entered here is used as the default ceiling height of each new space that you create on the Spaces screen.
  • Stories:This input is only used for reports.
  • Number of Dwelling Units:This input is used in domestic hot water demand calculations.
  • Total Number of Occupants:This input is used in domestic hot water demand calculations and for establishing fresh air requirements.
  • Default Building Air Tightness:This input sets the value of Estimated Seasonal Air Changes per Hour in the Heated Area Infiltration section of the Infiltration screen.
  • Use Window Shades in Summer:This checkbox allows the user to specify seasonal window shading. If the box is checked then the shading factor (or SHGC) of all windows in the building are reduced by 20% compared to the value for an un-shaded window entered on Windows screen for all months that are part of cooling season. Using this option reduces building cooling load.
  • Roof Color and Wall Color:These inputs are used to set solar absorptivity of exterior surfaces. The table below shows absorptivity values used in energy calculations depending on the selected surface type and color.
Surface Color Surface Type
Wall Roof
White 0.2 0.2
Light 0.5 0.6
Medium 0.6 0.75
Dark 0.8 0.95

Advanced:

This button allows the user to fine tune the energy model inputs:

  • Shielding Class:This strongly affects infiltration calculations if Detailed Infiltration algorithm is used.
  • Common Wall Area:This input is used in calculation of HERS rating of attached homes.
  • Entering Cold Water Temperature:This input is used in domestic hot water calculations for the model. A PDF with various entering cold water temperatures around the US is available here
  • Average Lighting Load:In units of Wh/SqFt-Day this input is used in Model Inspector to verify accuracy of lighting inputs.
  • Cooling Latent Load:This input is used for the load sizing and cooling energy calculations
  • Account for climate impact on HSPF and SEER:This checkbox adjusts the manufacturer-specified HSPF and SEER to account for site climate. The nameplate HSPF for a heat pump is based on the temperature in Climate Region IV (Pittsburgh, PA) and the minimum Design Heating Requirement (DHR) that is a function of machine heating capacity. This selection limits the contribution of resistance heating because it typically results in relatively high seasonal heating temperature. Site specific HSPF varies significantly with climate. All unitary air conditioners are rated using EER, a rating standardized by ARI, which reports steady-state efficiency at 95oF outdoor and 80oF indoor temperature. Smaller air conditioners (i.e., < 65,000 Btu/h) are also rated using SEER, intended to better indicate average seasonal performance. However, for single-speed equipment, SEER is simply estimated as the EER at 82°F outdoor and 80°F indoor temperature condition. SEER rating de-emphasizes high temperature performance. The TREAT climate efficiency degradation algorithm accounts for variations of actual equipment efficiency based on its rated efficiency and the climate at the building site. We recommend that this adjustment is used for all TREAT projects.
  • Account for Part Load System Efficiency:This checkbox adjusts model heating and cooling energy consumption to account for reduced efficiency during part load operation. The algorithm was developed based on information presented in the article “Residential Equipment Part Load Curves for Use in DOE-2” by Henderson, Huang and Parker. Part load ratio for each month was calculated by dividing monthly heating (cooling) load by the energy that the heating (cooling) system could generate at full load conditions during the same time interval. The part load adjustment is calculated for each month depending on equipment type and part load ratio during the month and varies between 0.75 and 1. If part load ratio for boilers is less than 0.1 then monthly usage is adjusted by 0.75 + 2.5 × PartLoadRatio. For forced air heating and cooling systems the monthly usage is adjusted by 0.75+0.25 × PartLoadRatio.

Billing Data

General Billing Data

Input on this screen is required for billing analysis.

Default conditioned area, (SqFt):

Enter the total area of all conditioned spaces in this field. This is a default value that may be changed for each analysis period. It is used to normalize billing analysis outputs, which is useful for comparison purposes.

Default target heating energy usage, (Btu/SqFt-HDD):

This is a default target value that may be adjusted for each analysis period on the Analysis Periods screen. It is used to calculate the investment potential of the building as indicated on Heating Energy Scorecard and Investment Guidelines for heating reports. The target is different for different buildings, however the following numbers provide a guideline:

  • Best new homes – 2Btu/SqFt-HDD
  • Energy Star homes – 5Btu/SqFt-HDD
  • Low usage existing homes – 7Btu/SqFt-HDD
  • Medium usage existing homes – 11Btu/SqFt-HDD
  • High usage existing homes – 15Btu/SqFt-HDD

Default savings term years (target payback):

This is a default payback period that is used to evaluate the investment potential of the building.

Heating Month Threshold, CDD/month:

The value entered here is used to identify the bills that do not have significant heating usage and are candidates for base load estimation. The heating threshold is used for all analysis periods.

Note: TREAT uses the reference temperature and average daily temperatures to calculate heating degree-days in each utility bill. It compares the HDD value to the entered winter bill threshold. If the difference for a 30-day bill is greater than the threshold and the bill dates are entirely within the heating season specified on Weather/Defaults screen, the bill is assumed to be heating-only bill. This algorithm is applied to all the bills that have base and/or cooling load in addition to the heating load.

 

Example:

Heating threshold depends on the building heat loss rate, reference temperature, and specifics of heating system control.

You anticipate that the building has the heat loss rate (slope) of 15Btu/SF-HDD and you set your Heating Month Threshold to 50 HDD/month. Then all the months during which the heating energy usage was less than 15 × 50 = 750Btu/SF-month will be used to calculate the base load. This input will work out well for the buildings where the heating system is turned off during warm months. Cooling Month Threshold HDD/month – The value entered here is used to identify the bills that do not include cooling. The procedure is similar to the one described for the winter threshold. This algorithm is applied to all the bills that have a base and/or heating load in addition to the cooling load.

Attempt to generate the missing meter readings:

This checkbox allows the user to activate a feature within TREAT to generate missing billing data.

Two algorithms are available:

  1. Use average meter readings of similar units for the same time period, if available:This algorithm may be applied to the billing data if there are similar individually metered spaces in the project. For example if there are three one-bedroom units in an apartment building and utility bills are available for only two of them. If this algorithm is used, the missing bills for the apartment are calculated as an average of the bills for two other apartments for the same time interval.
  2. Use average readings for the same meter for the periods before and after the missing reading, if available:

Example:

If there are meter readings available for December and February but not for January, then January daily usage is calculated as an average of December and February. This feature should be used with care if available bills cover time periods longer than one month or if missing billing data are for months of a different type than immediately preceding and following bills. For example, if available bills are for May and September, then the generated bills will not include any cooling energy usage. When this feature is used, the existing bills that cover different month types are not excluded from base load calculations. For example, in an electrically heated building the utility bill that covers August to November will normally not be used to estimate base load because August is non-heating month and October is heating month. However, such a bill will be used for base load calculations in case the bills are auto-generated, because excluding it and generating missing values based on July and November bills will present even greater error.

Note: Use the drop down box to specify which algorithms should be used and in what order. In order to use the first algorithm to the full extent you need to specify the types of individually metered spaces that are present in the building. This is done to avoid the situations where utility bills for a one-bedroom apartment are used to estimate the usage for a three-bedroom apartment. You may either use the suggested descriptors or enter custom ones. Note that if you have an individually metered space on the Metered Spaces screen that uses a descriptor, you may not edit this descriptor on the General Billing Data screen.

 

Metered Spaces:

This screen should be used only if there is more than one meter that measures consumption of at least one fuel. For example, if there is a single gas meter for an apartment building but electricity is metered separately for each apartment then you may need to describe each apartment on this screen.

Note: You do not need to create individually metered spaces if there is a single meter for each fuel in the project. TREAT will automatically generate the Whole Building space for your convenience. Even though the term “space” on this screen is the same as in the Building Model section, there is no connection between individually metered spaces entered here and the spaces entered for the building model on the Spaces screen. They are likely to be very different.

Space Name: unique name for the space.

Space Elevation, Space Area and Other Descriptors fields are used to describe the space. They allow taking advantage of TREAT’s capabilities to generate the missing billing data. The default value for these fields is NA.

Space Floor: input is used for record keeping.

Utility Bills:

You may enter the utility bill data here directly, or, if you are more comfortable with a spreadsheet, you can import your data from a comma separated data file (.CSV)

Select Individually Metered Space Name in the drop down box before entering the bills. All the spaces that were entered on the Metered Spaces screen are available for selection. You may also select Whole Building from the box if there is just a single set of bills for this fuel. If you entered fuel bills for the Whole Building space, then you will not be able to enter utility bills for individually metered spaces for this fuel.

Fuel:

Select from fuels listed in the drop down box. All the fuels entered on the Fuels/Rates screen are available for selection. The column headings on the table of utility bills will change to reflect the units for the selected fuel. Import Billing Data button opens billing data import utility that allows importing utility bills from text file into TREAT. The utility is described in a separate section of this manual.

Using the “Utility Data Import Template:

  • Enter data on the first empty line under the column headings; the rest of the essential years’ worth of data will automatically fill down.
  • Enter data down the Elapsed Days, Cost, and Unit Usage columns; change the estimated column only if necessary.
  • You may add as many rows as you need (keep the formulas intact), and remove any unused rows.
  • IMPORTANT – save, and then Export the data as .CSV file for import to TREAT.
Note: Old formatted utility data files will not work with this new import.  Copy the essential data from old to paste into this new template.  Be sure to order the columns correctly.

Tips:

  • Even if you don’t have your data in a spreadsheet now, you may find it easier to “Import Billing Data” and use the “Utility Data Import Template.”
  • If there are utility bills for an individually metered space other than the “Whole Building” for a particular fuel, TREAT will require that billing data is entered or generated for all the spaces entered on Metered Spaces screen.
  • Make sure that the metered space and fuel in the drop down boxes are set correctly before entering the bills. TREAT does not have a tool for copying the bills from one metered space to another.

Example:

You need to enter data for a multifamily building that has eight apartments. A single meter measures natural gas used for space heating. Each apartment has a separate electric meter. In order to run a billing analysis for both fuels you need to enter each apartment as an individually metered space on the Metered Spaces screen. On the Utility Bills screen, select Whole Building in the top drop down box and Natural Gas in the drop down box below. Enter the utility bills for the gas meter. Select the first apartment entered on the Metered Spaces screen in the top drop down box. Change the fuel to electricity and enter electric bills for this space. Enter the electric bills for all other apartments in the similar manner.

Manual Billing Data Input:

  • Start Month: The starting month of the utility bill, found on the billing statement.
  • Start Day: The starting day of the utility bill, found on the billing statement.
  • Start Year: The starting year of the utility bill from the billing statement. There is no default for starting date of the first bill. For other bills the default is set to the next day following the end of previous bill. You will not be allowed to save a utility bill if it overlaps with other bills for the same space and fuel.
  • Elapsed Days: The number of days between the start and the end date of the utility bill. TREAT assumes that the amount of fuel specified in Usage field was consumed during the time period specified in Elapsed Days field, starting from the start date of the bill.
  • Usage, units of fuel: This input is used to enter fuel usage from the utility bill.
  • Bill Type: Is the data from an actual Bill or a calculated estimate?
  • Include the Bill in the Analysis: Set the field to Yes if the billing data is reliable and represents typical usage during the time period. Set it to No otherwise, for example if you know that the occupants were away on vacation during this period or that there was construction on the site that might have significantly affected the fuel usage.

Tips:

  • Arrange the paper bills in chronological order to simplify data input. If the fuel is continuously provided by utility company (electricity, often natural gas) then elapsed days may be taken directly from the utility bill. If the fuel is shipped at variable time intervals (filling oil or propane tank), then enter the time in days between the two consecutive bills. If the fuel is shipped at variable time intervals (filling oil or propane tank), the usage shown on the following bill should be entered on the preceding bill.
  • Use Billing Data Import utility accessible from Accessories menu to import billing data in comma-separated format (.csv) into TREAT. See the corresponding section of the manual for more details about the utility.

Example:

The oil company delivered 200 gallons of oil on January 3 and filled up the oil tank. The next delivery of 175 gallons was on January 23. From these two bills we may conclude that 175 gallons of oil (usage) were consumed in 20 days (elapsed days) starting January 3 (start date).

  • Usage, $: Input the dollar cost of fuel. This cost is used to calculate the average cost of fuel displayed on the Analysis Periods screen. The input logic is similar to units of fuel input described above. Enter dollar amounts without using commas; for example, enter $1000, not $1,000.
  • Bill Type: Set the field to actual or estimated. Utility bills are treated differently during the calculations depending on the bill type.
  • Include the Bill in Analysis: Set the field to Yes if the billing data is reliable and represents typical usage during the time period. Set it to No otherwise, for example if you know that the occupants were away on vacation during this period or that there was construction on the site that might have significantly affected the fuel usage.

Analysis Periods:

The Analysis Periods screen is used to set the time period for which the utility bills will be analyzed and to run billing analysis calculations. You may create any number of analysis periods in the project. To create a new analysis period click the “New” button in the upper right corner of the screen and enter the period name. Use the Delete and Rename buttons to delete and rename the analysis periods.

In order for TREAT to run a billing analysis, it must have weather data for the time period covered by the analysis. Check the Daily Weather Data library to confirm that TREAT has data for the period of interest. Start Month and Start Year define the starting date of the period. TREAT assumes that the period starts on the first day of the specified month. End Month and End Year define the ending date of the period. TREAT assumes that the period ends on the last day of the specified month.

Note: An Analysis Period may be of any length. All utility bills that are completely within the start and end date of the analysis period are included in the analysis. As with all statistical calculations, the more utility bills are included the more reliable the outputs are, so an analysis period should cover as many bills as possible.

Begin by naming your analysis period and selecting a start and end date. The following inputs are also necessary:

Target Heating Energy Usage:

This value is by default equal to the corresponding input on the General Billing Data screen. It is used to estimate the investment potential of the building.

Savings Term:

This value is by default equal to the corresponding input on the General Billing Data screen. It is used to estimate the investment potential of the building. Compare billing data for the period with the model created for box is only used if the building model was created. You may select the Base Building (the existing building without any improvements) as described on the building model screens or any package created on the Packages screen for which calculations have been performed. The required information about the building is taken from the building model screens. All the inputs described below are disabled if this box is checked.

Building Type:

Refers to the building insulation and tightness. Select the building description from the drop down box. This input helps you to estimate the default heating reference temperature in the box below.

Heating Reference Temperature, F:

The maximum outdoor temperature at which the building requires heating. It mainly depends on the thermostat set point, building insulation, air tightness, mechanical ventilation, and internal, as well as, solar gains. This temperature is always less than or equal to the average indoor temperature during the heating season.

Cooling Reference Temperature, F:

This value is the same as heating reference temperature, but for cooling. This temperature is always less than or equal to the indoor air temperature during the cooling season. The default value does not depend on the selected building type because internal and solar gains have a greater influence on the reference temperature.

Heated Area, SqFt:

The total area of conditioned space. The default value is based on the input in the corresponding field on the General Billing Data screen. The value is used to normalize results of billing analysis for presentation in reports.

 

Is Building Cooled:

If this field is set to Yes it is assumed that the electric bills included in the billing period reflect cooling usage in addition to other loads.

Primary Heating Fuel:

The fuel used by the main heating system. Select from the list of fuels entered on the Fuels/Rates screen.

Secondary Heating Fuel:

The fuel used by the back-up heating system that operates when the primary system cannot satisfy the heating load. Select a fuel other than the primary heating fuel from the list entered on Fuels/Rates screen.

Fuels Used for Base Load:

Check the box next to the name of the fuel that is used for loads other than heating and cooling. Multiple fuels may be selected.

Calculate Base Load Statistics:

Click the button to analyze utility bills for the analysis period to separate base load usage from heating/cooling usage for each fuel selected as primary, secondary or cooling fuel. The calculation results are displayed in the table.

Average Fuel Cost, $/Unit of Fuel:

The sum of $ divided by the sum of units for all bills in the analysis period. Bills partially in the analysis period are pro-rated. Average Fuel Cost $/Unit of Fuel includes any fixed monthly meter costs that are included in the utility bills.

Note: If the billing analysis is used to calibrate the model, use the average fuel cost displayed in the table for the Energy Cost $/Unit field of Fuels/Rates screen.

Base Load for Analysis:

  1. Select the “calculated base load”button to use the base load calculated by TREAT and displayed in the table for the billing analysis. In some cases the billing information that you have entered may not be sufficient to calculate the base load.ExampleOil is used for space and hot water heating. You have entered a single record on Utility Bills screen for the annual oil usage. In this case TREAT is not able to separate the bill into heating and base load portions and you are asked to enter estimated base load. A similar situation occurs if you enter multiple bills, but all of them are for the time periods with a higher HDD/month than the value of Heating Month Threshold, HDD/Month set on the General Billing Data screen. If each bill contains both heating and base load, then the base load cannot be calculated.
  2. Select the “estimated base load” button to use the estimated base load displayed in the last row of the table for the billing analysis.

If you feel that the calculated base load displayed in the table does not reflect the actual base load or if TREAT is unable to calculate the base load automatically, you may choose to use estimated base load for billing analysis. Enter the base load for all heating and cooling fuels in the window that appears after the radio button is selected. You may also enter or edit this value directly in the table on the Analysis Periods screen.

Note: For analysis periods compared to model, you may choose to enter the model base load as estimated base load. The base load for each fuel is comprised of lighting, appliance and domestic hot water loads. Lighting and appliance load of the model may be obtained from the Model Inspector Lighting/Appliances tab. Lighting and appliance load for electricity is equal to the sum of the load in Btu/Day-SqFt shown below the lighting table and the electricity load from appliances shown in the corresponding row of the Appliances table. Appliance load for other fuels may be taken from Appliance Load table. DHW load may be taken from Model Energy Report.

Use the following equation to convert DHW load to correct units:

DHW[Btu/Day-SqFt]=DHW[$/year]/EnergyCost[$/Unit] × EnergyContent[Btu/Unit]/365/HeatedArea[SqFt]

  • DHWLoad [$/year] may be obtained from the first chart of Model Energy Report.
  • EnergyCost [$/Unit] and EnergyContent [Btu/Unit] may be taken from the DHW fuel row of the Fuels/Rates screen.
  • HeatedArea [SqFt] is shown on the Analysis Periods screen.

Run Billing Analysis:

Click the button to perform billing analysis for the analysis period. The detailed calculation results may be viewed on the reports for the analysis periods. Calculation summary is shown in the pop-up window after the calculations are complete.


Billing Model

The building model category is where you will build your model. In these sections you can add information from Spaces to Thermostats to Appliances. The helpfile is organized by each sub category below.


Spaces

The building can be modeled either as a single space or multiple spaces. The decision as to whether multiple spaces are necessary depends on many factors. If two spaces are operated at different temperatures (have different thermostat set points, overheated or under-heated due to distribution loss, imbalance or internal gains), different heating or cooling schedule, have different mechanical ventilation loads, or one space (perhaps an attic, basement or garage) is unconditioned, then use of multiple spaces may be necessary. If you plan to use TREAT for sizing a heating or cooling system, then each area for which the design load is of interest should be modeled as a separate space. A little experimentation will soon reveal the cases in which a more complex multi-space description is needed.

Note: If each room in the building is modeled as a separate space, the input may be very time consuming. In most single-family houses all rooms that belong to one heating/cooling zone and are serviced by one thermostat may be modeled as a single space. Be sure to consider the following pieces of information.
  • If an unheated space is vented (for example if this is a vented crawl space) you may choose not to model it as a separate unconditioned space. Instead you may enter the surfaces that are adjacent to this space (floor of the first level) as adjacent to exterior.
  • An un-vented roof cavity that will be filled with insulation may be modeled as unconditioned space.

Spaces:

This window has several inputs that must be made. These include: Space Type, Space Name, Ceiling Height Ft, Elevation Ft, Conditioned, Occupied Hrs./Day, and Persons.

Space Type:

Sets the defaults for all other input fields on this screen except for floor area. It also defines the occupancy schedule used by TREAT to calculate internal heat gains and default infiltration of unheated spaces.

Space Name:

Allows the user to assign a custom name to the space. Be as descriptive as possible, because this name will be used on many screens to define the location of walls, lighting, appliances, etc. The space name must be unique for the project.

Ceiling height:

Allows the user to enter the height of the ceiling in feet. If the space has a varying ceiling heights as in the case for a sloped ceiling then enter the average height for that space. Ceiling height is used in infiltration calculations to calculate building volume.

Floor Sq. Ft:

Requires inputting the area of the space in square feet. For each space the product of the ceiling height and floor area should be equal to the actual volume of the space. Floor area is used to calculate defaults for the distribution system and in many reports that display area-normalized outputs.

Note: The total floor area of all floors must be entered for a multi-story building that is modeled as a single space. Ceiling height in this case must be equal to the ceiling height of one floor. Floor area is not the footprint of the building. For example, to model a three story building with 4000 SqFt area per floor and 8 Ft ceiling height as a single space, you would enter 12,000 SqFt in Floor Area field and 8 in the Ceiling Height field. You would NOT enter 4000 Sq.Ft. in the Floor Area field and 24 in the Ceiling Height field.

Elevation ft.:

This number is the height of the space floor above the floor of the lowest level. For example if the building has a basement then elevation of a space is equal to the height of the floor of this space above the basement floor. Basement elevation is equal to zero. The elevation is used to calculate stack effect.

Conditioned:

This field should be set to Yes if the space is part of the conditioned area (if it is heated and/or cooled).

Occupied Hrs./Day:

Use this field to enter the number of hours each day that the space is occupied

Example:

Two three-hour meetings are held in a meeting room on an average weekday. Occupied [Hr/Day] =2[meetings per day] × 3[hours per meeting] × 5[week days per week]/7[days per week]

Persons:

This input represents the number of people that are typically in this space when it is occupied. TREAT accounts for internal gains in calculations of heating and cooling annual energy consumption by generating hourly occupancy schedule based on number of persons, hours occupied and space type. The following logic was used:

  1. Sleeping Quarters: center hours on 2 am.
  2. Living Space: first 10 hours – center on 8 pm; next 8 hours center on 11 am; last 6 hours will be distributed between 12 am and 6 am as follows: start from 1 am, next 6 am, next 2 am, then 5 am, then 3 am, then 4 am.
  3. Office: center hours on 1 pm.
  4. All other spaces: half is centered on 7 am; the other half centered on 7 pm.
Note: For heating load sizing, no credit is given for internal heat gains from occupants; however, occupancy affects cooling load sizing.

If you enter an unheated space after you have entered surfaces for other spaces in the project, remember that you need to go back to the Surfaces screen and add surfaces not just for the new space, but also to the existing heated spaces that are adjacent to it. Otherwise your new unheated spaces will appear disconnected from the heated building envelope.

The Advanced button brings up a window with optional inputs for the selected space.

Is the Space Furnished:

This box allows accounting for the thermal mass of furniture and light interior partitions. By default, the value is set to Yes for conditioned spaces and to No for unconditioned spaces. For spaces created in the versions prior to TREAT 2.5, the default value is No for all types of spaces.

Heavy (brick) interior walls:

This input allows accounting for the added thermal mass of heavy interior walls, such as a central fire place. The heavy walls may play an important role in solar gain calculations.

Use Natural Ventilation for Free Cooling During Non-Heating Months:

This input allows for modeling the effect of opening the windows when the outdoor temperature is below 68F and the space temperature is above 70F. Natural ventilation is modeled only for the months that are not part of the heating season, which is specified on the Weather/Defaults screen. Natural ventilation will not be modeled if a 12-month heating season is specified.


Walls and Surfaces

Energy modeling requires that each space have at least one wall/surface. In order for the model to be accurate you should enter all surfaces through which a significant amount of heat is gained or lost. Conditioned spaces may have surfaces adjacent to Outdoors, Ground or unconditioned spaces defined on Spaces/Rooms screen. Unconditioned spaces may have surfaces adjacent to Outdoors and Ground. No surfaces between conditioned rooms (interior partitions) may be entered. Data input on the screen starts with selection the space for which the surface is being entered. Choose any space that you described on the Spaces/Rooms screen from the Surfaces In drop down box. Click the Next and Previous buttons to switch between spaces. The buttons are disabled if there is only a single space in the project.

  • Before leaving the screen use Next and Previous buttons to go through all the spaces in the project and make sure that at least one surface is entered for each space.
  • You do not have to enter each physical surface in the space separately. For example, for the basement you may choose to enter all four below-grade walls as a single surface, since exposure is not relevant. In this case use basement perimeter instead of wall length.

The Description field allows the user to specify the surface construction. You can either select constructions from the list of typical constructions or from TREAT Surface Library. The list of typical constructions in the combo box may be customized by editing Surface Constructions tab of Preferences that are accessible from Project Group menu. Select <Library> at the end of the list to open TREAT Surface Library.

The Walls/Surfaces screen allows you to enter a number of inputs including a Description, Code, Type, Adjacent to, Exposure, Length ft., and Height ft.

Descriptions:

Hold the cursor over the description input in the Input Area to view the complete wall description if the text is cut off. The R-value in the description is the overall thermal resistance of the surface including framing and excluding air film.

Code:

This field is filled out automatically after the surface construction is selected. It can be used as a shortcut to enter surface descriptions without opening the library. When you start entering a new surface you may go directly to this field and enter the code. Surface construction will be displayed as soon as you move to the next field.

Note: You may use surfaces that you have already entered for the space as a reference for the surface code of the new surfaces.

Type:

This input allows you to select the type of surface; inputs include wall, ceiling, sloped or flat roof, etc.

Adjacent To:

This field can be set to Outdoors and Ground or, if the surface is in conditioned space, it may also be adjacent to any unconditioned space that you have entered on Spaces screen.

Note: A typical walk-out basement has a portion of the wall below grade and the other portion above grade. Such a wall should be entered as two different surfaces, one adjacent to Ground and one adjacent to Outdoors. You must enter correct dimensions (length and height) and elevation for each section of the wall.

Exposure:

This field refers to the direction a surface is facing and must be filled in for all exterior surfaces except for horizontal ones (surfaces with zero tilt). Set exposure to NA for such surfaces.

Note: It is important to enter the accurate exposure for each above grade exterior wall because it has a strong influence on infiltration and window solar gains.

 

Length and Height:

These inputs define dimensions of the wall for heat loss and infiltration calculations. For horizontal surfaces such as floors and ceilings use Height field to enter width. The product of length and height must be equal to the gross surface area. TREAT will use door and window areas entered on the following screens to calculate the net surface area.

Note: Height of the wall is used to calculate stack effect. If multiple stories are modeled as a single space and the height of the wall is entered as the ceiling height of one floor times the number of floors, then the infiltration losses for the space may be exaggerated, because internal partitions between the stories are ignored.

Use the Advanced Inputs button to edit surface name, tilt, elevation, overhang, side fins and albedo.

Name:

This optional input that can be used to further describe a surface.

Elevation:

The Elevation equals the height of the bottom edge of the surface above space floor. It is used to calculate stack effect. Elevation of the floor is 0. Elevation of the ceiling is equal to the ceiling height. Elevation of a typical wall that goes from floor to ceiling is 0.

Tilt:

The angle of the surface from horizontal in degrees. Enter 90 for a vertical wall, 0 for floors and horizontal ceilings and any number in between for a sloped ceiling.

Overhang and Side Fin Depth:

These inputs are used for exterior walls to model the effect of solar gain on energy consumption. TREAT assumes that the overhang is located at the top of the wall at a right angle to the wall. Left and right side fins are located at the corresponding edge of the wall at the right angel to the wall.

TREAT uses the following logic for modeling surfaces adjacent to ground:

Walls

  • TREAT attaches 0.68′ layer of soil to walls that are 1ft high or less. Temperature of surrounding soil is assumed to be equal to the ambient air temperature for the hour.
  • TREAT attaches layer of soil equal to Wall Height × 0.77 to walls that are between 1 and 3 feet high. Soil temperature is assumed to be equal to the ambient air temperature for the hour.
  • Below grade walls that are more than 3 feet high are modeled as two separate walls. First wall is 3′ high, has 2.31′ layer of soil attached to it, and loses heat to ambient air temperature, Second wall is (WallHeight-3) feet high and has 3′ layer of soil attached to it. Temperature of surrounding soil is assumed to be equal to average annual air temperature.
  • Slabs are modeled as two separate surfaces. First surface is 3′ wide slab perimeter ring. It has 3′ layer of soil attached to it. Temperature of surrounding soil is assumed to be equal to the ambient air temperature. The second surface is of the same area as the remaining section of the slab and has 3′ layer of soil attached to it. The temperature of surrounding soil is assumed to be equal to the average annual air temperature.
  • Losses are calculated from 3′ perimeter ring around the slab. 9′ layer of soil is attached to the perimeter wring and the temperature of surrounding soil is assumed to be equal to average annual air temperature. Layers of soil are attached to the surface in order to model insulating properties of soil. Thickness of the soil layer is selected to approximate the length of heat flow path through ground. For the typical building configurations the algorithm produces results that are very close to heat loss coefficients specified in ASHRAE Fundamentals starts on page 21.

Slab on Grade:

  • Slabs are modeled as two separate surfaces. First surface is 3′ wide slab perimeter ring. It has 3′ layer of soil attached to it. Temperature of surrounding soil is assumed to be equal to the ambient air temperature. The second surface is of the same area as the remaining section of the slab and has 3′ layer of soil attached to it. The temperature of surrounding soil is assumed to be equal to the average annual air temperature.

Slab below Grade:

  • Losses are calculated from 3′ perimeter ring around the slab. 9′ layer of soil is attached to the perimeter wring and the temperature of surrounding soil is assumed to be equal to average annual air temperature. Layers of soil are attached to the surface in order to model insulating properties of soil. Thickness of the soil layer is selected to approximate the length of heat flow path through ground. For the typical building configurations the algorithm produces results that are very close to heat loss coefficients specified in ASHRAE Fundamentals starts on page 21.

Exterior Doors

Select the name of the space and exterior wall to which the door belongs from the drop down boxes at the top of the screen. Use the Previous Space and Next Space buttons to switch between spaces in the project. Use the Previous Wall and Next Wall buttons to switch between exterior surfaces of the selected space.

  • Click on the Door Description field once to display the default door construction, double-click to open the Door Library. The Code field as a shortcut to enter a door description.
  • Enter Width and Height of the door in feet. These fields are used by TREAT to calculate the net door area. An Error message will be displayed if the door area is greater than the area of the wall to which it belongs.
  • Use the Quantity field to enter multiple doors of the same construction that belong to the same surface.
Note: If the door has glass areas you must describe these areas separately on the Windows screen. Remember to adjust door width and height to exclude the glass area.

Windows

Select the name of the space and exterior wall to which the window belongs before entering data in the Input Line. The combination of Frame and Glazing allows the user to define a wide range of windows.

  • Glazing Description: Select from the list of typical glazings or from TREAT Glazing Library.
  • Glazing Code is a numeric code that may be entered to specify the glazing without opening the Glazing Library.
  • Frame Description contains the specification of the window frame. Clicking on the field displays the default frame entered on Weather/Defaults screen. Double click on the field to bring up the Frame Library. 
  • Frame Code is a numeric code that may be entered to specify the frame without opening the Frame Library. Select library at the end of either list to open TREAT respective library.

The Glazing Library and the Frame Library are both accessible above the Feedback Panel.

 

The list of Typical Glazings or Typical Frames may be customized by editing Glazing Description on Windows tab of Preferences. Preferences are accessible from Project Group menu.

Note:  The NFRC (National Fenestration Rating Counsel) has a standardized testing procedure that is used to create the ratings for U-value and SHGC (Solar Heat Gain Coefficient) that appear on the NFRC label on new windows. The NFRC ratings are for the entire fenestration product (glass and frame combined). Smaller windows have a greater ratio of frame area to glass area than larger windows, which affects the overall rating of the window. For this reason, the NFRC uses standard sizes, residential size and non-residential size, to compare different windows regardless of size.

If you have the NFRC ratings for U-Value and SHGC for a particular window, then you may enter these values in the Custom Window Properties dialog. Be aware that the Glazing and Framing type still play a factor in the calculations and must be entered appropriately. TREAT calculates the U-value and SHCG for the specific sizes of windows in the building model. The SHGC and U-value for a specific window are not the same as the NFRC rated SHGC and U-value unless the window is the same size as the standard “residential” or “non-residential” sizes used to generate the NFRC ratings. To help determine which Frame and Glazing should be selected from the TREAT Frame Library and Glazing Library to model existing or proposed replacement window that has certain NFRC U-value and SHGC, the table below contains U-value (including film resistances) and SHCG for various window assemblies. All windows in the table are NFRC residential size. Slider type is either horizontal slider or vertical slider.

 

U-value and SHGC for residential-size window assemblies
Frame Description Glazing Description Type Frame Code Glazing Code Window U-value Window SHGC
Wood/vinyl, Fixed 7/8″ double glass, 0.63″ argon space, e = 0.1 on surface 2 or 3, clear Fixed 16 141 0.31 0.47
Wood/vinyl, Operable 7/8″ double glass, 0.63″ argon space, e = 0.1 on surface 2 or 3, clear Slider 15 141 0.33 0.4
Wood/vinyl, Fixed 7/8″ double glass, 0.63″ argon space; e = 0.2 on surface 2 or 3, clear Fixed 16 139 0.34 0.51
Wood/vinyl, Operable 7/8″ double glass, 0.63″ argon space; e = 0.2 on surface 2 or 3, clear Slider 15 139 0.35 0.43
Wood/vinyl, Fixed 7/8″ double glass, 0.63″ air space, e = 0.1 on surface 2 or 3, clear Fixed 16 140 0.35 0.47
Wood/vinyl, Operable 7/8″ double glass, 0.63″ air space, e = 0.1 on surface 2 or 3, clear Slider 15 140 0.37 0.4
Aluminum with 3/8″ thermal break, Operable 7/8″ double glass, 0.63″ argon space, e = 0.1 on surface 2 or 3, clear Slider 7 141 0.37 0.43
Wood/vinyl, Fixed 1/2″ double glass, 0.25″ argon space, e = 0.1 on surface 2 or 3, clear Fixed 16 22 0.38 0.47
Wood/vinyl, Fixed 7/8″ double glass, 0.63″ air space, e = 0.2 on surface 2 or 3, clear Fixed 16 138 0.38 0.51
Wood/vinyl, Operable 1/2″ double glass, 0.25″ argon space, e = 0.1 on surface 2 or 3, clear Slider 15 22 0.39 0.4
Wood/vinyl, Operable 7/8″ double glass, 0.63″ air space, e = 0.2 on surface 2 or 3, clear Slider 15 138 0.39 0.43
Aluminum with 3/8″ thermal break, Operable 7/8″ double glass, 0.63″ argon space; e = 0.2 on surface 2 or 3, clear Slider 7 139 0.39 0.47
Aluminum with 3/8″ thermal break, Operable 7/8″ double glass, 0.63″ air space, e = 0.1 on surface 2 or 3, clear Slider 7 140 0.4 0.43
Wood/vinyl, Fixed 1/2″ double glass, 0.25″ argon space, e = 0.2 on surface 2 or 3, clear Fixed 16 18 0.4 0.51
Wood/vinyl, Operable 1/2″ double glass, 0.25″ argon space, e = 0.2 on surface 2 or 3, clear Slider 15 18 0.41 0.43
Aluminum with 3/8″ thermal break, Operable 1/2″ double glass, 0.25″ argon space, e = 0.1 on surface 2 or 3, clear Slider 7 22 0.42 0.43
Aluminum with 3/8″ thermal break, Operable 7/8″ double glass, 0.63″ air space, e = 0.2 on surface 2 or 3, clear Slider 7 138 0.42 0.47
Wood/vinyl, Operable 1/2″ double glass, 0.25″ air space, e = 0.1 on surface 2 or 3, clear Slider 15 20 0.43 0.4
Wood/vinyl, Fixed 1/2″ double glass, 0.25″ air space, e = 0.1 on surface 2 or 3, clear Fixed 16 20 0.43 0.47
Aluminum with 3/8″ thermal break, Operable 1/2″ double glass, 0.25″ argon space, e = 0.2 on surface 2 or 3, clear Slider 7 18 0.44 0.47
Wood/vinyl, Operable 1/2″ double glass, 0.25″ air space, e = 0.2 on surface 2 or 3, clear Slider 15 16 0.45 0.43
Wood/vinyl, Operable 7/8″ double glass, 0.63″ argon space, clear Slider 15 133 0.45 0.48
Wood/vinyl, Fixed 1/2″ double glass, 0.25″ air space, e = 0.2 on surface 2 or 3, clear Fixed 16 16 0.46 0.51
Wood/vinyl, Fixed 7/8″ double glass, 0.63″ argon space, clear Fixed 16 133 0.46 0.57
Aluminum with 3/8″ thermal break, Operable 1/2″ double glass, 0.25″ air space, e = 0.1 on surface 2 or 3, clear Slider 7 20 0.47 0.43
Wood/vinyl, Operable 7/8″ double glass, 0.63″ air space, clear Slider 15 132 0.47 0.48
Wood/vinyl, Fixed 7/8″ double glass, 0.63″ air space, clear Fixed 16 132 0.48 0.57
Wood/vinyl, Operable 1/2″ double glass, 0.25″ argon space, clear Slider 15 6 0.49 0.48
Aluminum with 3/8″ thermal break, Operable 1/2″ double glass, 0.25″ air space, e = 0.2 on surface 2 or 3, clear Slider 7 16 0.5 0.47
Aluminum with 3/8″ thermal break, Operable 7/8″ double glass, 0.63″ argon space, clear Slider 7 133 0.5 0.52
Wood/vinyl, Fixed 1/2″ double glass, 0.25″ argon space, clear Fixed 16 6 0.51 0.57
Wood/vinyl, Operable 1/2″ double glass, 0.25″ air space, clear Slider 15 4 0.52 0.48
Aluminum with 3/8″ thermal break, Operable 7/8″ double glass, 0.63″ air space, clear Slider 7 132 0.52 0.52
Aluminum with 3/8″ thermal break, Operable 1/2″ double glass, 0.25″ argon space, clear Slider 7 6 0.54 0.52
Wood/vinyl, Fixed 1/2″ double glass, 0.25″ air space, clear Fixed 16 4 0.54 0.57
Aluminum with 3/8″ thermal break, Operable 1/2″ double glass, 0.25″ air space, clear Slider 7 4 0.57 0.52
Aluminum w/o thermal break, Operable 1/2″ double glass, 0.25″ air space, clear Slider 1 4 0.61 0.56
Wood/vinyl, Operable 1/8″ single glass, clear Slider 15 1 0.86 0.57
Aluminum with 3/8″ thermal break, Operable 1/8″ single glass, clear Slider 7 1 0.95 0.62
Wood/vinyl, Fixed 1/8″ single glass, clear Fixed 16 1 0.95 0.68
Aluminum w/o thermal break, Operable 1/8″ single glass, clear Slider 1 1 1 0.66

Shading ranges from 0 if there are opaque blinds covering the window to 1 for clear glass with no external or internal shading. By default the shading factor is set to the value that corresponds to the selected glazing with no additional shading. The meaning of the shading factor (SF) is similar to the shading coefficient (SC) found in the ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals; however, the numerical values are not the same. The shading coefficient in the ASHRAE Handbook is defined as the ratio of the solar heat gain through a given glazing assembly to that of a reference single-pane, double-strength, clear (DSA) glass. The shading factor used in TREAT is the ratio of the solar heat gain through the given assembly to the solar heat gain through a similar glazing assembly with clear glass of the same thickness. For glazing systems with only clear glass, the shading factor is one. However, for glazing systems with tinted glass or with selective coatings, the shading factor will have a value less than one. The shading factor also allows modeling the effects of curtains, Venetian blinds, and various types of external shading devices.

Example (1):

Window A is a double-pane window with clear glass. It’s SHGC=0.52 and SF=0.52/0.52=1.0. Window B is the same as window A, but with a spectrally selective coating on surface 2 and 3 and SHGC=0.47 (Glazing Code 16). The shading factor for window B is calculated as the ratio of the solar heat gain of window B to the reference window A: SF=0.47/0.52=0.9. If you know the value of SHGC or SC of the window you want to use and the corresponding value for the reference window, you may calculate the shading factor SF as described above and enter the value in TREAT.

Example (2):

Window B from the previous example has a shading screen that provides 65% shading. The screen may be modeled in TREAT by adjusting the shading factor of the window as follows: 0.9 × (1-65/100) =0.316.

Height above Floor:

This input is the height of the window sill above the space floor. The value is used in solar gain calculations if the surface has an overhang.

Quantity:  

This field allows entering multiple windows that belong to the same surface and have the same parameters.

Example:

An eight-story 300′ × 300′ building has floor to ceiling height of 8 feet. It is modeled as a single space with an area of 72,000 square feet and a height of 8 feet. Four exterior walls (one wall per exposure) with the width of 30′ and height of 8 × 8′ = 64′ are entered. Each wall has 80 windows of the same size and construction. Input time will be significantly reduced if you create a single record for the windows on each wall and enter 80 in the quantity field. TREAT will use a default algorithm to locate the windows on the wall and calculate the net wall area and window shading. If the walls have overhangs, then this input simplification will not correctly account for the influence of the overhangs on solar gains. If accurate solar gain calculations are of interest, you need to define walls so that TREAT can place the windows on the wall in one row. In our example, if each window has an overhang, for example a balcony above it, then you may need to enter eight walls with overhang per exposure, with ten windows per wall. Remember that you also need to use Layer-by-layer calculation mode in order to accurately account for the solar gains.


Infiltration

TREAT provides 3.4 distinct panes for modeling infiltration. Heated Area Infiltration and Unheated Space Infiltration inputs are required to proceed. Holes in the building is an optional input.

Heated Area Infiltration:

This screen allows the user to enter combined infiltration of all the heated spaces to exterior and unheated areas. Input may be based on the visual inspection of the building or the blower door test measurements. By default the value is set to Air Changes per Hour based on default building air tightness specified on the Weather/Defaults screen.

Unheated Space Infiltration:

This screen allows the user to enter infiltration of each unheated space in the project. By default the infiltration is set to 2 ACH for unheated vented spaces and 0.5 ACH to unheated unvented spaces. Modify this value to reflect the actual air leakage. Infiltration input for unheated space is ignored if all the walls in the space are adjacent to “ground”.

Holes in the Building:

This screen allows the user to describe the visible openings in the walls of conditioned spaces. If no input is made on this screen then the value entered on Heated Area Infiltration screen is converted to effective leakage area and allocated to surfaces adjacent to outdoors in proportion with their area. Sealing individual holes can be modeled as an improvement only if the holes are defined on this screen.

Place the mouse over the leakage Input Area to view the overall leakage of the heated space. This leakage is calculated using your input on Infiltration of Heated Area screen.

Example:

A heated building envelope has three exterior walls and one wall adjacent to unheated attic. All walls are of the same size. Based on Heated Area Infiltration input (see separate input screen) estimated leakage is 100 SqIn (automatically calculated by TREAT). If no input is made on this screen, leakage area of each wall is allocated to walls in proportion to their area and is equal to 100/4=25 SqIn. If a 20 inch leakage area is entered for the wall adjacent to unheated space then leakage through exterior wall is (100-20)/4 = 20 SqIn. Leakage through the wall adjacent to unheated space is 20+20 = 40 SqIn.

Note: TREAT automatically accounts for the variations of air density at the elevation of Long Term Weather Site specified on Weather/Defaults screen.

Heating and Cooling

TREAT allows specifying main (primary) and back-up (secondary) heating systems. The same thermostat controls both systems. The secondary system is turned on when the primary system capacity is not sufficient to satisfy the building load.

Primary Heating System:

Click the check box to indicate that there is a primary heating system in the building. This is a required condition for running energy calculations.

  • Modeling Hydronic Systems In some cases TREAT may set hydronic piping area defaults to the calculated area for duct-work. This leads to unrealistic distribution losses which causes the heating plant not to be able to satisfy the heating load or thermostat setting. If you view the Base Building model in the Model Inspector you will see the warning about he hearing system not being able to meet the heating load. To correct this issue simply uncheck and recheck the primary heating system box. This will force TREAT to recalculate the correct default piping area which should be 19.6 Sq.Ft. of supply and return piping per 1q. Ft. of conditioned space.
  • Heating Type: This selection tailors the additional inputs needed to the selected type. Set type to Other if your system is not listed in the drop-down box; for example, if it is a wood stove.
  • Fuel: Selected from the list of fuels entered on Fuels/Rates screen.
  • Input Capacity: The Input Capacity must be entered in Btu/hour.

 

  • Year: This input is for your records only
  • Annual Efficiency: Often referred to as Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency (AFUE); the annual efficiency represents heating equipment performance over an entire heating season. It includes performance during start-up, steady state, and cool-down operations. The AFUE is calculated from performance parameters that are measured experimentally using U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) test procedure. This test includes combustion efficiency, jacket loss, and off-cycle flue loss. Credit is given for design features such as flue dampers. AFUE does not account for electricity consumption and therefore does not include the circulating air (or water pump for boilers) and combustion fan power consumption.
  • Annual Efficiency of heating system may deteriorate overtime. Use the Calculate Efficiency button open the Heating System Efficiency screen and calculate the annual efficiency of the heat plant.
  • Steady-state efficiency is the maximum efficiency achieved after a heating system has been running long enough to reach its peak operating temperature. It is equal to the ratio of the heat actually available to the distribution system to the amount of heat potentially available in the fuel. Since Steady-State Efficiency takes into consideration the jacket losses, it is lower than the Combustion Efficiency, but higher than AFUE which accounts for start-up and cool-down losses.

Detailed Input: A detailed input may be designated to give more specificity to your model.

  • Listed Annual and Steady-state Efficiencies:

These two values may be obtained from equipment nameplate or manufacturer directory.

  • Measured Steady-state efficiency:

In order to find this number for furnaces one has to measure airflow and temperature rise, and for boilers one has to measure water flow and temperature rise, and for both furnaces and boilers one has to measure gas/oil input at the fuel meter. This measurement and the associated calculations are clearly more complicated than a combustion efficiency test. Actual and listed combustion efficiencies may be entered instead of steady state efficiencies. If, and only if, jacket losses are known or assumed to be very small, which is a reasonable assumption primarily for new furnaces and low-mass boilers, steady state efficiency is close to the combustion efficiency.

Combustion Efficiency is a measurement of efficiency based on the percentage of heat lost up the flue while operating at a steady state condition. Combustion efficiency is determined indirectly, based on measuring flue gas parameters such as temperature and percent carbon dioxide or oxygen. TREAT relies on the assumption that deterioration in AFUE is proportional to the deterioration in combustion (or steady-state) efficiency. Then, the listed AFUE and listed combustion (or steady state) efficiency and measured actual combustion (or steady state) efficiency may be used to calculate actual AFUE as follows:

AFUE actual = AFUE listed (CombustionEfficiency actual / CombustionEfficiency listed

A rule of thumb may be used as a last resort when the listed efficiencies are not available. In such cases you may estimate AFUE by multiplying the measured combustion efficiency by 0.85. For example, if the measured combustion efficiency is 75%, the AFUE is around 75% x 0.85 = 64%.

  • Enter Supply and Return Temperatures and other parameters specific to your heating system.
  • Year and Location of heating system is recorded for record keeping purposes only.

Secondary Heating System:

Click the check box to indicate that there is a secondary heating system in the building. This will enable the secondary system inputs, which are similar to primary system inputs.

Note: Heat plant output capacity may affect heating consumption of the building due to the following:

  1. If there is no secondary heat plant in the project or if there is a secondary heat plant and secondary system control is set to operate the secondary system when primary system capacity is insufficient then model heating consumption displayed on the Feedback Panel and in reports is limited by the capacity of the heating system. In this case if the system output capacity is insufficient to satisfy building heating load, the displayed heating consumption will be lower because on cold days the temperature in the building will be less than the specified thermostat set point. Check the load sizing report to make sure that the building heating system is not undersized.
  2. Low heat plant capacity leads to longer heat plant run time, which may increase distribution loss and hence overall heating consumption.
  3. The current version of TREAT does not model the heat plant standby loss. Consequently, oversizing the heating system is not penalized.

Secondary System Control:

These inputs allow for describing how the heating load is allocated between primary and secondary system. Two control modes are supported:

  • Operate when primary capacity is insufficient: This mode allocates the energy between primary and secondary systems based on primary system output capacity. In this mode secondary system operates only when primary system capacity is insufficient to satisfy building heating load. The percentage of heating energy generated by secondary heating system is different for every month.
  • Fixed percentage of monthly energy usage: This mode allocates the energy between primary and secondary system for every month based on fixed percentage entered by user. In this mode energy consumption of primary and secondary heat plants is not limited by system capacities.
Note:  When secondary system control mode is changed, the energy consumption is not just shifted from one system to another; the total monthly energy will likely also be different due to different heat plant efficiencies and different calculated distribution efficiencies of primary and secondary systems. For example if overall primary system efficiency is 80% and overall secondary system efficiency is 70%, then the total building energy consumption increases as entered percentage of monthly energy usage by secondary system goes up. This is expected because larger a fraction of the heating load is now satisfied by less efficient system.

Air Conditioning:

Click the check box to indicate that there is a cooling system in the building.

Total Output Capacity, Btu/Hr:

Specify overall output capacity of the cooling system. If there are multiple room air conditioners in the building, add up their capacity and enter the total in the input field.

SEER/EER:

This measure represents the efficiency of the cooling system. Enter capacity-weighted average efficiency if you have multiple room air conditioners.

Example:

There are three room air conditioners in the building with output capacities of Q1, Q2 and Q3 Btu/hr and efficiencies of E1, E2 and E3 EER. Then the total output capacity Q=Q1+Q2+Q3. Capacity-weighted efficiency E= (Q1ÃE1+Q2ÃE2+Q3ÃE3)/ (Q1+Q2+Q3).

Type:

May be set to Central or Room Air Conditioner. The selection does not affect the calculation results.

Number of Units:

This input does not affect calculations. It is used only for the record keeping and reports.

Note: Cooling energy usage and load will not be calculated if you entered a cooling system but have not specified any spaces as cooled on Thermostats screen.

Use the Heating and Cooling libraries to obtain information on typical systems.

The Edit Primary Distribution System button allows the user to customize the distribution system description.

  • Shared with Cooling:This box should be checked for a forced air distribution system that is used for both heating and cooling. The checkbox is enabled only if a cooling system has been entered.
  • Estimated Total Distribution Efficiency:This value is used as a starting point for heating energy use calculations. This value is recalculated by the program depending on distribution location (heated/unheated areas), insulation, leakage, etc. The calculated value is displayed in the Design Heating and Cooling Load report.
  • Insulation R-Value:This is the R-value of pipe/duct insulation not including air film. Since distribution losses to conditioned space are usually minimal, we recommend entering average R-Value of distribution located in un-conditioned spaces.
  • Total Area of Piping/Ductwork:Represents the overall surface area of the piping/ductwork. The default is provided based on the total conditioned area in the building. Defaults should be overwritten with detailed site measurements, if available. Diameter and perimeter of the outer surface should be used. Surface area of circular pipe/duct can be calculated as the sum of 3.14 (Diameter)(Length) for all pipe/duct segments. Surface area of rectangular duct can be calculated as the sum of Cross Section Perimeter(Length) for all duct segments.
  • % Of Piping/Ductwork Running through Each Space:This selection allows allocating the distribution system to spaces entered on the Spaces screen. By default the allocation is done in proportion to floor area of each space at the time the distribution system was first entered. The distribution system allocation may be changed, or it may be reset to default by clicking the following selection
  • Reset % Piping/Ductwork to Default:The sum of values in each column should always be equal to 100%. The input is used along with distribution leakage and/or insulation to calculate distribution loss and allocate it to spaces through which distribution system is running.
Note: Specify heat pumps in both Primary Heating System and Air Conditioning sections. Entering a heat pump in the heating section only will not automatically account for cooling energy.

Modeling Heat Pumps in TREAT

Before modeling any type of HVAC equipment that uses a heat pump, read through the General Settings for Heat Pumps section as well as the Modeling Instructions for Specific Types of Heat Pump Types section below.

General Settings for Heat Pumps

This section gives information on some of the settings that should be used to model heat pumps, and detailed information on what inputs to enter into TREAT.

Account for Climate Impacts on HSPF and SEER

Heating Season Performance Factors (HSPF) and Seasonal Energy Efficiency Rating (SEER) are seasonal efficiencies often used to predict performance over an entire year. The actual performance of the equipment depends on a number of factors including the climate in which the equipment is being operated.

When modeling heat pumps it is recommended that the user checks Account for Climate Impact on HSPF and SEER. This option is on the Weather/Defaults page within the Advanced section.  This option enables the TREAT climate efficiency degradation algorithms in order to account for the effects of the local climate on the rated efficiency.  Please see the “General Information Screens” page in the manual for more details.

Input vs. Output Capacity

Heat pump specifications typically list the rated output capacity for theheating and/or cooling, however, TREAT requires input capacity.

Please note that while Account for Climate Impact on HSPF and SEER algorithm accounts for the local climate impact on the rated efficiency, it is up to the modeler to enter the SEER or HSPF that accurately describes the efficiency at which the equipment operates.  Due to age, improper charge, improper sizing, and operating conditions, this may be different from the rated efficiency of the unit.  Additionally, the efficiency should be bounded by the calibration process and/or real world performance constraints such as those listed in the ANSI/BPI-2400 standard.

To convert rated output capacity to input capacity:

  1. Convert the HSPF to a COP:    COP = HSPF / 3.412
  2. Divide the output capacity by the COP.    Input Capacity = Rated Output Capacity / COP
  3. Enter the calculated input capacity and HSPF into TREAT.

Example: 

To enter a 30,000 Btu/hr (2.5 ton), 10 HSPF ASHP system into TREAT:

  1. COP = 10 / 3.412 = 2.93
  2. Input Capacity = 30,000 / 2.93 = 10,239 Btu/hr.
  3. Select Air Source Heat Pump and enter the capacity as a 10,239 Btu/hr with a 10 HSPF
  4. Double check your calculations by viewing the Design Heating and Cooling Loads Report after running the model with these inputs. The Available Heating Equipment Output Capacity should match the output capacity with which the calculations for this step began.

Converting EER to SEER

Seasonal Energy Efficiency Rating (SEER) efficiency values must be entered for all cooling systems in TREAT.  Packaged AC units are typically rated in Energy Efficiency Rating (EER).

To convert EER to SEER:

SEER = EER / 0.875

Modeling Instructions for Specific Heat Pump Types

This section gives specific instructions for modeling each of the most common types of heat pumps. Please follow the instructions in the General Settings for Heat Pumps section to understand how to convert output to input capacity, SEER versus EER, and rated efficiency versus in service efficiency.  If the equipment being modeled has a backup heating system, also follow instructions in the Modeling Backup Heat section.

Ductless / Mini-Split Heat Pump (MSHP)

  1. Create an air conditioning system by checking the appropriate box on the Heating/Cooling screen.
  2. Select:  Room Air Conditioner
  3. Enter the cooling output capacity in Btu/hr and efficiency in SEER.
  4. If the equipment provides heating, create a primary or secondary heating plant, as appropriate and select type Air Source Heat Pump.
  5. Enter the calculated heating input capacity in Btu/hr and efficiency in HSPF.
  6. Click the Edit Primary/Secondary Distribution System button and change the Duct Test Leakage and Total Duct Surface Area to zero in order to account for no ductwork.
  7. If applicable, set the secondary system control to Fixed Percentage of Monthly Energy Use.  Use the best information available to estimate the percentage contribution of the secondary system.
  8. For multiple mini-splits, please see the section on Combining Multiple HVAC Equipment for Entry into TREAT

Central Air Source Heat Pump (ASHP)

  1. Create an air conditioning system by checking the appropriate box on the Heating/Cooling screen.
  2. Select:  Central Air Conditioner
  3. Enter the cooling output capacity in Btu/hr and efficiency in SEER.
  4. Create a primary or secondary heat plant, as appropriate for the building systems, and select type Air Source Heat Pump.
  5. Enter the calculated heating input capacity in Btu/hr and efficiency in HSPF.
  6. Click the Edit Primary/Secondary Distribution System button and change the settings to ensure that the entries match audit and duct testing results.  Check the Shared with Cooling box to apply these setting to the cooling system.
  7. If the ASHP is the primary heating system and includes a backup heating system (integrated or separate), model the backup as the secondary heating system.

Ground Source Heat Pump (Geothermal)

  1. Create an air conditioning system by checking the appropriate box on the Heating/Cooling screen.
  2. Select:  Central Air Conditioner
  3. Enter the cooling output capacity in Btu/hr and efficiency in SEER.
  4. Create a primary or secondary heat plant, as appropriate for the building systems, and select type Ground Source Heat Pump.
  5. Enter the calculated heating input capacity in Btu/hr and efficiency in HSPF.
  6. Click the Edit Primary/Secondary Distribution System button and change the settings to ensure that the entries match audit and duct testing results.  Check the Shared with Cooling box to apply these setting to the cooling system.

Ground Water Source Heat Pump (Open Loop System)

Follow the instructions for the Ground Source Heat Pump, except select Groundwater Source Heat Pump as the equipment type.

Window / Sleeve AC Unit or Heat Pump

  1. Create an air conditioning system by checking the appropriate box on the Heating/Cooling screen
  2. Select: Room Air Conditioner
  3. Enter the cooling output capacity in Btu/hr and efficiency in SEER.
  4. If the equipment provides heating, create a primary or secondary heat plant, as appropriate and select type Air Source Heat Pump.
  5. Enter the calculated heating input capacity in Btu/hr and efficiency in HSPF.
  6. Click the Edit Primary/Secondary Distribution System button and change the Duct Test Leakage and Total Duct Surface Area to zero in order to account for no ductwork.

Modeling Back-Up Heating System

This section describes how to model the back-up heating system(s) that operate with the heat pump system.

Secondary System Control

As a starting point, set this to Operate when primary capacity insufficient.  During calibration process,  if the primary and secondary heating energy consumption between the Building Model and Billing Data are not in agreement in the feedback pane, change the secondary system control to Fixed Percentage of Monthly Energy Use.  Then iteratively change this percentage and re-calculate results to calibrate the model within your desired bounds.

If the secondary heating system runs in tandem with the primary, set the Secondary System Control to Fixed Percentage of Monthly Energy Use and use the best available information to estimate the percentage of monthly heating energy consumption.

The capacity and efficiency of the backup systems should be entered based on the real specifications of the equipment. The following are some of the most common backup heating system and how they should be entered.

Ducted Gas Backup: Create a natural gas furnace as a secondary heating system.

Ducted Electric Backup: Create an electric furnace and enter an efficiency of 100% as the secondary heating system.

Electric Baseboard Backup: Create an electric baseboard backup heating system.

Ductless Mini-Splits: A mini-split that provides heating and cooling in addition to the primary heating plant should be modeled both as a secondary ASHP heating and cooling system.

Combining Multiple Pieces of HVAC Equipment for Entry into TREAT

Modeling buildings with multiple distributed HVAC systems, such as multifamily buildings with in-unit heating systems, requires that multiple pieces of equipment must be combined for entry into TREAT.

  1. Sum the capacities of the equipment.
  2. Create an average of the efficiencies. If possible, create a weighted average of the efficiencies using the best data available. Assuming the runtimes of all equipment are similar, use the output capacity for determining this weighted average.

Example:

There are three room air conditioners in the building with output capacities of Q1, Q2 and Q3 Btu/hr and efficiencies of E1, E2 and E3.

The total output capacity Q = Q1+Q2+Q3

The capacity-weighted efficiency E = (Q1xE1 + Q2xE2 + Q3xE3) / (Q1+Q2+Q3)

 


 

Thermostats

The Thermostat screen is used to group the spaces into heating/cooling zones and enter indoor temperature setting and schedule. Each conditioned space must be assigned to a zone.

Note: In the program interface the word zone is used as a synonym of thermostat.

Group of Spaces Served:

This input allows the user to create and edit heating/cooling zones. Click this field to open the Assigned Spaces to Thermostats window.

Assign Spaces to Thermostats:

This window will not appear if all the conditioned spaces have already been assigned to thermostats. To change the assignment you must first remove the space from the zone to which it was assigned by editing this zone. You may then re-assign this space to a new or existing zone.

Spaces not served by any thermostat:

This area contains the list of spaces that are specified as conditioned but are not yet assigned to a thermostat.

Spaces served by this Thermostat:

This area contains the list of spaces that are assigned to this thermostat.

To add a space to the zone, select it in the left panel and click > to move it to the right.

Click >> to move all the spaces in the left panel to the right.

Select a space in the right panel and click < to detach the space from this thermostat.

Click << to detach all spaces from this thermostat. You will not be allowed to close the window if no spaces are assigned to the thermostat (if the right panel is empty), because each thermostat must control at least one space.

Click OK to confirm your selection or Cancel to discard the inputs.

Programmable:

Select Yes for programmable thermostat and No for non-programmable. The selection applies to both heating and cooling settings (if any) and enables the input fields for setback temperature and time.

Is Area Heated:

Select Yes if this is a heating or heating/cooling thermostat, No otherwise. The following three input fields will be disabled if you select No.

  • Occupied Heating Temperature: If you have a non-programmable thermostat, enter its set point here. If you have a programmable thermostat enter its higher setting (set up temperature).
  • Unoccupied Heating Temperature: This field is disabled if you have a non-programmable thermostat. If you have a programmable thermostat enter its lower temperature setting (set back temperature).
  • Unoccupied Hours per Day: This field is disabled if you have a non-programmable thermostat. If you have a programmable thermostat, enter the number of hours per day that the thermostat is set back to its lower setting.

Is Area Cooled:

Select Yes if this is a cooling or heating/cooling thermostat, No otherwise. The three following input fields will be disabled if you select No.

Occupied Cooling Temperature:

If you have a non-programmable thermostat enter its set point here. If you have a programmable thermostat; enter its lower setting (temperature when the building is occupied).

Unoccupied Cooling Temperature:

This field is disabled if you have a non-programmable thermostat. If you have a programmable thermostat; enter its higher temperature setting (temperature during unoccupied periods).

TREAT uses the following logic to generate the hourly schedule for space temperature based on specified occupied and unoccupied temperature and hours per day:

  1. Temperature for the first 8 “un-occupied” hours is centered on 2 am;
  2. Temperature for the second 8 “un-occupied” hours is centered on 2 pm;
  3. Temperature for the rest of the day is split between (a) and (b).

Example:

TREAT input:

Occupied Heating Temperature – 70F

Un-occupied Heating Temperature – 60F

Un-occupied Heating Hrs/day – 12 hr.

Occupied Cooling Temperature –75

Un-occupied Cooling Temperature – 85F

Un-occupied Cooling Hrs/day – 8

Hourly Schedule

Hour AM PM AM
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
Heating F 60 60 60 60 60 70 70 70 70 70 70 60 60 60 60 70 70 70 70 70 70 60 60 60
Cooling F 85 85 85 85 85 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 85 85 85

Thermostat schedule may be manipulated by switching occupied and un-occupied temperature. For example, the cooling schedule above assumes that air conditioning is used during the day. If you want to specify night usage, you may set un-occupied temperature to 75F and occupied temperature to 85F. Specify heat pumps in both Primary Heating System and Air Conditioning sections. Entering a heat pump in the heating section only will not automatically account for cooling energy.

Unoccupied Hours per Day:

This field is disabled if you have a non-programmable thermostat. If you have a programmable thermostat enter the number of hours per day the thermostat is set at its higher setting. Use Delete button on Thermostats screen to delete a thermostat. All spaces that were served by the deleted thermostat will be available for a new assignment.

  • TREAT will display a warning message when calculations are performed if an air conditioning system is entered on Heating/Cooling screen and some of the thermostats are heating-only. You may choose to ignore this message and proceed with calculations if you feel that your inputs are correct.
  • TREAT uses the area of the spaces specified as conditioned on the Spaces screen to calculate all the area-normalized values such as heating and cooling slope. These outputs might be inaccurate if some of the zones are heating or cooling only.

Fans

The Fans screen allows the user to describe mechanical ventilation in the building.

Fan Name:

The unique name of the fan.

Ventilated Area

This box brings up the Assign Spaces to Fan window.

  • Assign Spaces to Fan window: Only conditioned (heated or/and cooled) spaces may be assigned to a fan. Each fan may serve multiple rooms. Each room may be assigned to not more than one fan.
    • Heated or Air Conditioned Spaces Not Served by any Fan area contains the list of spaces that are specified as conditioned but not yet assigned to a fan.
    • Heated or Air Conditioned Spaces Served by This Fan area contains the list of spaces that are already assigned to this fan, along with their floor area entered on the Spaces screen.

The total ventilated area in square feet is shown below the table. The area is updated each time a space is added or removed from the right panel.

Select a space in the left panel and click > to move it to the right and attach to the fan.

Click >> to attach all the spaces in the left panel to this fan.

Select a space in the right panel and click < to detach the space from this fan.

Click << to detach all spaces from this fan. You will not be allowed to close the window if no spaces are assigned to the fan (if the right panel is empty), because each fan must control at least one space.

Click OK to confirm your selection or Cancel to discard the inputs.

Use Delete button on the Fans screen to delete a fan. All spaces that were served by the deleted fan will be available for a new assignment.

Ventilation Rate CFM:

A CFM value may only be entered after the Ventilated Area box is filled in. Default value for this field is the CFM equivalent of 0.35 ACH for all rooms served by this fan. To edit the value click the gray area and the Ventilation Rate window will open.

  • Ventilation Rate window allows the user to specify ventilation rate in CFM or ACH. Click Convert to ACH (CFM) button any time during the input to convert between the two. The Ventilation Rate may be entered as total for the fan or on room-by-room basis. To Set Total Ventilation Rate select the appropriate radio button and enter the value. The total ventilation rate is distributed between the rooms that are served by the fan in proportion with the room volume.
Note: When you close the Ventilation Rate window and return to the Fans screen, the ventilation rate will display in CFM.

To Assign Ventilation to Each Space select the appropriate radio button and enter ventilation rate for each space manually.

The method described in ASHRAE Standard 136 may be used to superimpose exhaust and supply ventilation. Enter the resulting mechanical ventilation rate on the Fans screen.

Click OK to confirm the inputs or Cancel to discard.

Heat Recovery Efficiency %:

This value is only entered if a heat recovery ventilator is used. Enter 0 if there is no heat recovery.

Hours per Day Fan is On:

The average daily fan run time in hours. Your input on the Fans screen does not account for the electric load of fan motors. To model the electric load of the fan motors, the motors must be entered on the Appliances screen. The Appliance Library contains a few sample fan motor sizes with yearly electrical consumption based on usage assumptions given in the library. Verify that the usage assumptions in the library apply to your model, and adjust yearly electric consumption as necessary.


Domestic Hot Water (DHW)

 

Type:

Use this option the appropriate type from the drop-down box. If a space heating boiler is used for hot water (water heater type is Space-heating boiler w/storage tank or Space-heating boiler w/tankless coil) then both heating and non-heating season efficiencies must be entered. Type input is also used for Home Energy Ratings.

Fuel:

Select a fuel from the drop down box. Any fuel entered on Fuels/Rates screen may be chosen.

Rated Volume and Rated Input Capacity:

This value may be taken from the water heater nameplate.

 

Rated volume:

This input is used to calculate jacket loss if the Additional Insulation R-value input is greater than 0 for an existing or proposed water heater. It is also used to calculate annual average efficiency if stand-by loss is entered instead of the energy factor. Rated Input Capacity is used for records only.

Design Supply Water Temperature:

The water heater or mixing valve set point. This input is used to calculate hot water demand and pipe losses.

Additional Insulation R-Value:

This R-value is used to adjust heater jacket loss and overall efficiency.

Location:

Select the space where the water heater is located. This input is used to estimate the jacket loss of the water heater. Jacket loss affects heater energy consumption and internal heat gain of the space where the heater is located.

Solar Fraction:

Select the fraction of the hot water that is generated by solar. This default is set to 0.

Number of identical water heaters:

This input is used to calculate total jacket loss.

Year:

Entering the year is used for record-keeping purposes only.

Note: TREAT uses two efficiency values for water heaters – Recovery Efficiency and either Energy Factor or Stand-by Loss.

Efficiency data for variety of water heaters is available in TREAT Water Heater library accessible from the Water Heater screen. The brand-specific data is available in the GAMA directory at AHRI.

Recovery Efficiency:

This input allows the user to define ratio of energy delivered to the water to the energy content of the fuel consumed by the water heater.

Energy Factor:

The energy factor is measure of water heater overall efficiency determined by comparing the energy supplied in heated water to the total daily energy consumption of the water heater.

Note: The EF should only be used for equipment that has been rated and has an Energy Guide label.

Standby loss:

The average hourly energy consumption divided by the average hourly heat energy contained in the stored water, expressed as percent per hour.

Note: The following relationships may be used to calculate the Energy Factor using the Energy Guide annual usage estimate:
  • For gas heaters, Energy Factor = 150 / [Energy Guide Therm/year].
  • For electric heaters, Energy Factor = 4396 / [Energy Guide kWh/year].

The stand-by loss from combination space and domestic hot water heating systems may differ significantly between heating and non-heating seasons. TREAT allows entering two efficiency values for such systems. TREAT uses the input to calculate the average seasonal efficiency taking into account the heating season months entered on the Weather/Defaults screen. Heating season length is assumed to be 6 months if the heating season entered on the Weather/Defaults screen spans more then half the year.

Hot Water Piping:

This box allows describing the domestic hot water piping system.

Insulation R-value:

By default this value is set to 1.5. The value represents average insulation of the piping system.

Total Area of Piping:

Here you can enter the surface area of hot water piping. The default value is equal to 0.8% of the total area of conditioned spaces. Edit the defaults based on field measurements. The surface area of pipe can be calculated as the sum of 3.14 × Exterior Diameter × Length for all pipe segments.

Note: This value may not be reasonable for Multifamily Applications, see “Modeling Multifamily Domestic Hot Water Systems” below for more details.

If part of the piping system is located in an unheated space(s) and is poorly insulated and if the losses from the rest of the piping are not significant, you may choose to adjust Total Area of Piping input to represent only piping located in the unheated space(s). You can then specify insulation R-value to reflect the piping insulation in the unheated space(s) only and allocate all of the pipe area to the unheated space(s). Such a model will reflect pipe losses more accurately and provide a better estimate of savings from pipe insulation.

Recirculating System:

Set to Yes if there is a hot water loop to make hot water readily available for remote loads. Such systems are mainly used in multifamily buildings. This input is used to estimate hot water distribution loss.

For recirculating systems you can specify the control strategy and the circulating pump capacity. Recirculate When Water Temperature F Falls Below input allows specifying the aquastat set point. By default the value is equal to design supply water temperature (no aquastat).

Hours per Day Recirculation is on:

This input allows modeling timer-controlled recirculation. By default it is set to 24 hours (no timer control).

Circulating Pump HP:

This section allows the user to account for energy consumed by the circulating pump. The hours of operation of the circulating pump are calculated using the control strategy inputs. Credit is given for both aquastat-controlled and timer-controlled recirculation.

% Of Piping Running Through Each Space:

Here you can allocate a percentage of piping to each space in the project. By default 100% of the piping is assigned to the space where the water heater is located (specified in the Location field). The sum of percentages for all spaces in the table should equal 100%. This information is used by TREAT to calculate distribution losses and overheating.

Hot Water Demand:

Use this area is used to enter or adjust hot water demand.

Usage Adjustment Multiplier:

This section allows scaling the hot water demand calculated by TREAT upward or downward. The resulting demand is shown in the Calculated Hot Water Demand box. Click the Calculate button in the box to recalculate demand after inputs are changed. The usage adjustment multiplier is not applied to appliance hot water usage that is specified on the Appliances screen.

Are Dishes Hand washed:

If you enter yes in this field, then the usage associated with hand washing of dishes is added to the hot water demand. If there are dishwashers in the building you must enter them on the Appliances screen in order to account for their water usage.

Click the Help button for information on typical hot water demand.

Note: The ASHRAE Handbook of Application gives low, average, and high hot water demand for apartment buildings as 14, 30 and 54 gallons per person per day respectively. It typically varies from a daily average of 42 gal/apartment for buildings with 20 or less apartments to 35gal/apartment for buildings with 200 or more apartments.

Low usage is associated with buildings having such occupant demographics as all occupants working, seniors, middle income, and high population density.

High usage is associated with high percentage of children, low income, public assistance, and no occupants working.

Unfired Storage Tanks:

This button brings up a screen that allows entering hot water storage tank information to account for additional hot water load due to tank stand-by losses.

Modeling Multifamily Domestic Hot Water Systems

This section contains a practical guide for modeling Domestic Hot Water Systems in multifamily structures. Please read carefully as these tips can directly impact the accuracy of your model.

Energy Factor (EF):

This input is only to be used for equipment that has been rated and has an Energy Guide label.  Typically, this is only for residential type equipment.  The following relationships may be used to calculate the Energy Factor using the Energy Guide annual usage estimate.  Remember that you may have to first convert the $/year on the label to units of energy.

  • For gas water heaters, Energy Factor = 150 / [Energy Guide Therm/year]
  • For electric water heaters, Energy Factor = 4396 / [Energy Guide kWh/year]

Domestic Hot Water Piping:

This area shall include all piping throughout the entire system in both conditioned and unconditioned spaces.  Unlike heating and cooling distribution where it is proper to only model the portion of the distribution that is in unconditioned spaces, losses from domestic hot water piping affect the heating/cooling loads of the building.  The user should modify the total distribution piping area and the percent allocation of that piping to the correct spaces.

  • TREAT’s default for domestic hot water piping area is 0.008 * Total Conditioned Floor Area.  This is reasonable for residential systems but may be too small for multifamily building, especially high-rise buildings that have larger pipes for the risers and branches.
  • Allocate the DHW piping to the correct spaces.  Typically, the majority of the piping area will be in the conditioned space and only a fraction in the boiler/mechanical room(s).

Tank Volume of the boiler/water heater:

  • The Tank Volume input is used to calculate jacket losses if the Additional Insulation R-value input is greater than zero for an existing or proposed water heater.  It is also used to calculate jacket losses if stand-by loss is entered instead of energy factor.
  • The Tank Volume is for the boiler/water heater regardless if it is the heating boiler with a tankless coil, a summer boiler, a heating boiler that heats a storage tank, etc. The Tank Volume should include all boilers that fire in order to heat the domestic hot water, but should not include the volume of any unfired storage tanks. Those should be entered separately in the Unfired Storage Tank input screen.

Input Capacity:

The instructions in the magenta question mark next to this input should be followed.

The Usage Adjustment Multiplier:

This multiplier should be used to get a reasonable Estimated Demand of Gal/per day person. The Help button on the DHW Screen takes the user through a few questions to describe the building’s population profile and uses lookup values from the ASHRAE Handbook to give reasonable domestic hot water usages/day/person.

Note: This multiplier input should not be pushed to unreasonable values just to calibrate the DHW energy usage.  It likely means that other inputs are incorrect.

Recirculation Systems:

These systems should always be modeled in TREAT if they exist in the building as they significantly affect the DHW energy usage and are a great Energy Conservation Measure (ECM) if they are currently not controlled.  The default settings in TREAT when the user selects “Yes” for Recirculating System are for 24/7 recirculation with no control.  The user can enter the aquastat temperature and/or the maximum recirculation time, if an aquastat or timer exists or to add as an ECM.


Lighting

These inputs allow the user to describe the lighting load in TREAT.

Description:

This input allows the user to assign a unique name to the lighting fixture or the group of lighting fixtures.

Watts per Fixture:

Used to enter Watts per fixture including ballast (if any).

Hours on Per Day:

This input allows the user to enter average daily usage time for the fixture(s). The input in this field is used to generate the hourly schedule depending on the type of space in which the lighting is located. The hourly schedule for each type of space is as follows:

  1. Sleeping Quarters: center hours on 10 pm;
  2. Living Space: center hours on 8 pm;
  3. Office: center hours on 1 pm;
  4. Outdoor lighting : center hours on 10 pm;
  5. All other spaces: center half the usage on 7 am and the other half on 7 pm.
Note: According to a pilot study “Incorporating Lighting and Appliance Energy Consumption into the Home Energy Rating Score” prepared by Architectural Energy Corporation, the statistical average connected lighting load in single family houses is 1.25 W/sqft and the lamps are lit on average 2.34 hours/day.

A monitoring project commissioned by the Bonneville Power Administration and Tacoma Public Utilities referenced on LBL website (http://eetd.lbl.gov/btp/papers/38454.pdf, Tribwell and Lerman, 1996) showed similar results, with an average of 2 hours per day operating time and lighting load of 1.47 W/sqft.

When the exact lighting usage in an existing home is not known, the statistical averages presented above should be used to enter the lighting load in TREAT.

Note: Lighting load distribution throughout the day may significantly affect heating and especially cooling load. Compare two cases – in one case a single 60W bulb is lit 24 hours/day; in the other case eight 60W bulbs are lit 3 hours during night/evening time. In both cases the lighting load is 1440Wh/day, but cooling usage on a mild summer day when cooling is needed during the day but not at night may differ significantly. In the first case the lighting increases cooling load; in the second case cooling and lighting do not interact with each other since they do not occur simultaneously.

Count:

Enter the total number of fixtures in the group.

Location:

Select the space where the group of fixtures is located or exterior. Exterior fixtures contribute to the base load calculations but not to the space internal gains.

Copy Lighting from Another Space:

This button found above the Feedback Panel opens the Lighting Wizard window. The Lighting Wizard allows the user to copy lighting from one space to the other spaces. It should be used if spaces in the project have similar lighting.

  • Copy All Lighting From select the space from which you would like to copy lighting.

To specify the spaces to which the lighting will be copied.

  • Every Conditioned Space: radio button indicates that the lighting will be copied to each space that was specified as conditioned on Spaces screen.
  • Every Unconditioned Space: radio button indicates that the lighting will be copied to each space that was specified as unconditioned on Spaces screen.
  • Let Me Pick the Spaces: radio button allows user to select spaces to which the lighting will be copied.
  • Add to already defined lighting in theses spaces: radio button indicates that the new lighting will be added to the lighting that may have been already specified for these spaces.
  • Replace already defined lighting: radio button indicates that the new lighting will replace any lighting that has been entered for these spaces.

Input on this screen affects not only base load calculations, but also calculation of heating and cooling energy consumption due to interaction between cooling and internal gains. You may enter a single record per conditioned space to model overall building base load. TREAT assumes that 100% of lighting energy is lost in the form of heat to the space where the lighting is located.


Appliances

Appliance Name:

Used to enter unique name for appliance or group of similar appliances.

Electricity Usage kWh/year:

This value should represent the total annual electricity usage. This usage is assumed to be uniform throughout the year. TREAT assumes that appliance usage is distributed uniformly throughout the day.

Second Fuel:

Use this input to specify a second fuel (if any) used by the appliance from the list of fuels entered on the Fuels/Rates screen. Do not include the hot water fuel in this field. For example, a gas dryer has two fuels – electricity and natural gas. An electric dishwasher does not have a second fuel, even though it may use hot water from a gas water heater.

Annual Second Fuel Usage:

This value is the total annual usage of the second fuel. The value must be entered in Second Fuel Units per year displayed in the separate field. The units depend on the selected fuel and are the same as on the Fuels/Rates screen for this fuel. The usage is assumed to be uniform throughout the year.

Hot Water Usage gallons/year:

The annual hot water usage for a particular appliance. The usage is assumed to be uniform throughout the year. It is added to the hot water heater load and is accounted for in all calculations related to domestic hot water.

Location:

Marks the space in which appliance is located. The information is used for internal heat gain calculations.

Percent Heat Loss to Space:

The percentage of energy supplied to appliance that contributes to space internal gains. Most appliances lose all of their consumed energy to the surrounding space in the form of heat. For these appliances, Percent Heat Loss to Space should be set to 100%. However, some appliances eject part of the heat to the exterior. For example, a clothes dryer heats up air and then discharges it through the vent to outdoors. If you are not sure what to enter in this field look for a similar appliance in the Appliance Library. TREAT assumes that 10% of the heat from the domestic hot water consumed by the appliance contributes to space heat gain.

Note: Fans entered on the Appliances screen will only model the electric use of these fans and not the effect on heating or cooling that the fan has. The fans must also be entered on the Fans screen to model the heating and cooling effects of the mechanical ventilation.

Field Measurements:

This button opens the Appliance Metered Usage window. This calculator allows you to easily convert field measurements of energy consumption into yearly figures and copy them into the TREAT Appliances screen. Using a wattmeter and similar tools, you can record the consumption of electricity, second fuel, and hot water during measured time intervals. After entering the measured usage and time interval, click the Done button and the yearly usage will be calculated and copied to the input line for the current appliance.

Adjust Usage Assumptions:

This option can be found in the Appliance Library; this button opens the Adjust Usage Assumptions window. This calculator allows estimating annual fuel usage by a washer, dryer, dishwasher or cooking appliance based on how frequently the appliance is used. The annual fuel usage given in the appliance library is based on assumptions that are listed in the library, such as a stove being used for two hours each day. To calculate the annual usage if the stove was only used for 15 minutes each day, select the appliance in the library, click the Adjust Usage Assumptions button, and select the correct assumption from the drop-down list. Click the Done button and the revised yearly usage will be copied to the input line for the current appliance.


Load Sizing

Inputs on this screen are used for the Design Heating and Cooling Load report. Edit the values for the primary and secondary heating and cooling system types that are used in the Base Building or evaluated improvements.

Forced Air Distribution:

  • Furnace Heating Temperature Drop: design temperature difference between supply and return air temperature. The value is used for duct sizing.
  • Heat Pump Heating Temperature Drop: design temperature difference between supply and return air temperature used for heat pump distribution system sizing.
  • Cooling Temperature Drop: design temperature difference between supply and return air temperature used for sizing of cooling ductwork.

Electric Distribution:

  • Baseboard Capacity Watt/ft.:  baseboard capacity per manufactures specifications used to determine the length of baseboard required to meet the space heating load.

Hydronic Distribution:

  • Boiler Temperature Drop: design temperature difference between supply and return water. The value is used for pipe sizing.
  • Baseboard Capacity Btu/hr/ft: baseboard capacity per manufacture specifications used to determine the length of baseboard required to meet the space heating load.

Safety Factors:

  • Heating Safety Factor: the value is used to obtain the required heating equipment output capacity as noted on the Design Heating and Cooling Load report.
  • Cooling Safety Factor: the value is used to obtain the required cooling equipment output capacity as noted on Design Heating and Cooling Load report.
  • Distribution Safety Factor: specify the safety factor in percent. The value is applied to space distribution CFM/GPM as noted on Design Heating and Cooling Load report.

TREAT load sizing has been compared to Manual J. Heating and cooling loads calculated by TREAT proved to be slightly more conservative. Please use professional judgment in applying the results to sizing heating and cooling systems.

Building Inspection

The Building Inspection subgroup allows the user to enter data about physical inspections of the building being modeled. This section can help recommend additional actions to improve the health and safety of a home. It includes two sections Visual Inspection and Measurements.


Model Inspector

The Model Inspector is started by clicking Tools -> Model Inspector on the main menu. It is also shown each time calculations are completed. The feature may be turned on/off from the Project Group -> Options menu or from within the Model Inspector.

This utility examines the data that has been entered for the base building and each improvement package to catch common data input errors. The verification algorithms are general rules designed to check that the input and output data has a minimum level of consistency with a logical building model and with TREAT calculation algorithms. The tool was developed to catch the typical problems that were encountered by users seeking technical support.

Note: Model Inspector warnings do not necessarily mean that there are errors in the project. They just indicate that the inputs and outputs are unusual.

There are five tabbed pages in the Model Inspector. A Help button on each page opens a context-sensitive help window that gives more information about that topic. A tooltip next to each warning provides hints on how to resolve the issue. Position the mouse pointer over the ? to view it. This section includes the following topics:

The Inspection Summary gives an overall count of the warnings on each page of the Model Inspector. This tab also shows monthly energy usage broken up by fuel type and end use if calculation results are available for the selected model.

Model Inspector – Calculations

If calculation results are available for the base building or improvement package, the following verifications are performed:

  1. A Package does not save more than 50% of the energy used by the Base Building.
  2. The heating system is not undersized. If the heat plant is undersized, then the living space will be cooler than the thermostat set point temperature during cold weather, and energy usage of the building will be underestimated. For detailed information on heating load view the Design Heating and Cooling Loads Report.
  3. The heat plant output exceeds the building load by the safety factor specified on Load Sizing screen. This will not affect modeling results. Since heating systems are usually sized conservatively, this may serve as a warning that building heat loss or heating system losses are overestimated.
  4. The heat plant output adjusted for the safety factor does not exceed the building load by more than 50%. If it does, it may indicate that building heat loss or heating system loss is underestimated – for example not all surfaces/windows have been entered, useful heat loss from heating /DHW system/appliances is overestimated, infiltration is underestimated, heating/distribution efficiency is overestimated, etc.
  5. Heating distribution system efficiency is at least 60% for primary and secondary distribution systems, which is typical for residential applications. It is also important to check that estimated distribution efficiency entered in distribution window of Heating/Cooling screen does not differ significantly from calculated distribution efficiency shown on Design Heating/Cooling Load report. If the difference is large, enter estimated distribution efficiency equal to calculated distribution efficiency and recalculate the project.
  6. The heating reference temperature is at least 50 F. If the outdoor temperature is below 50 F, a typical residential building should require heating.
  7. The cooling reference temperature is at least 70 F. Typical residential buildings should not require cooling if the outdoor temperature is below 70 F.
  8. Calculated heating slope is in the typical range. It usually varies from 2 Btu/HDD-SqFt for best new construction to 25 Btu/HDD-SqFt for high usage existing home. Note that the limits may be different for your housing type.
  9. At least 500 HDD or CDD were used to calculate the Heating/Cooling slope. Heating/Cooling Slope may not be accurate if actual HDD/CDD are low since actual weather data in not available on hourly basis.
  10. Cooled spaces can usually take advantage of free cooling provided by natural ventilation, which may be entered on the Advanced window of the Spaces screen. Natural ventilation is modeled only during the months that are not part of the heating season. Heating and cooling seasons are entered on the Weather/Defaults screen.
  11. A table is displayed with the calculated average monthly temperatures of each unconditioned space. The temperature depends on the heat transfer through exterior surfaces, heat exchange with adjacent heated spaces, internal gains from lighting and appliances. It does not account for internal gains from heating or DHW systems, if any. Make sure that the temperatures are close to the ones measured during the site visit.

Model Inspector – Envelope

In order to obtain accurate modeling results it is important to enter all surfaces through which heat is transferred in and out of the building. Model Inspector runs the following verifications of the building envelope input:

  1. There is roof or ceiling adjacent to outdoors.
  2. There is floor adjacent to outdoors or ground.
  3. Total floor area is within 10% of the area of horizontal projection of roof/ceiling. The horizontal projection of the roof is calculated using roof tilt in degrees and the area of the roof surface in sq. ft.
  4. The area of all exterior surfaces in the project is not less than the surface area of a cube of the same volume as the building. The building volume is calculated as the sum of volumes of all spaces in the project. Space volume is calculated as the floor area multiplied by ceiling height.
  5. The R-value of all walls in conditioned space that are not adjacent to ground is at least R-4.
  6. Windows in conditioned spaces do not have single-pane glass.
  7. All heated spaces have window area of 10% to 40% of floor area, which is typical for residential construction.
  8. All unconditioned spaces have at least one surface adjacent to a conditioned space. Surfaces between conditioned and unconditioned spaces are entered in TREAT as attached to conditioned space and adjacent to unconditioned space. Unconditioned spaces that are not connected to conditioned spaces will be heated only by space heat gain from base load located in these spaces (such as lighting). This may result in unexpectedly low indoor temperature in these spaces and exaggerated losses from sections of distribution system located in these spaces. Heat exchange between unheated spaces and heated space(s) in the project will not be accounted for. Check the Calculation Results tab of the Model Inspector to make sure that the temperature of unheated spaces is close to what you observed during the site visit.
  9. All unconditioned spaces have a surface adjacent to outdoors. This is important if “Surface Leakage Proportional to Area” infiltration algorithm is selected on Weather/Defaults screen. In this case the infiltration input for unconditioned spaces with no surfaces adjacent to outdoors will be ignored and the resulting building heat loss may be significantly underestimated
  10. Infiltration of conditioned spaces is between 0.2 and 2 ACH, which is typical of residential construction.
  11. If “Leakage allocated in proportion to surface area” is selected as the infiltration algorithm on the Weather/Defaults screen, then area of holes in the building should account for at most 10% of overall building infiltration. Due to the nature of algorithms employed in the detailed infiltration calculations, the accuracy of modeling results may be compromised if area of holes in the building accounts for more than 10% of overall building infiltration.

Model Inspector – HVAC

The following verifications of input data related to heating, ventilation and air conditioning are performed:

  1. Room air conditioners, if present, are not being used to cool the entire building. Typically room air conditioners service only part of a building.
  2. Room air conditioners, if present, are not maintaining the same thermostat set point 24 hours per day. Typically room air conditioners are turned off during part of the day. This usage pattern may be modeled in TREAT by entering programmable thermostat with high setback temperature.
  3. Central air conditioning, if present, is being used to cool all conditioned spaces in the building, which is typical for most of the installations.
  4. There is a domestic hot water heater in the building. DHW affects heating and cooling load through stand-by losses. Omitting it will also interfere with model/billing calibration, especially if heating/cooling and DHW fuels are the same.
  5. The domestic hot water heater is located in unconditioned space, which is typical of most buildings. Note that if DHW heater is located in conditioned space, then its stand-by loss will contribute to useful heating of the space.
  6. There is mechanical ventilation in the building. Residential buildings typically have kitchen or bathroom exhaust fans that are used occasionally. Multifamily buildings often have ventilated common spaces.
  7. The mechanical ventilation for each space is below 0.5 ACH. Ventilation rate over 0.5 ACH is in excess of typical residential applications.
  8. If the primary and secondary heat plants are located in different spaces, there will be a warning reminding that both heat plants heat the entire conditioned space. The secondary heat plant is modeled in TREAT as operating only when the capacity of the primary heat plant is not sufficient to satisfy heating load.
  9. Combustion efficiency for boilers and furnaces should be measured. The annual efficiency entered into TREAT for boilers and furnaces should be below the measured combustion efficiency.

Model Inspector – Lighting Appliances

The following verification of lighting input is performed: The lighting in conditioned spaces is within 20% of the average Wh/SqFt/Day as entered on the Weather/Defaults  -> Advanced screen. The default value that the Model Inspector uses for the average is 3 Wh/SqFt/Day if a different value has not been entered.

According to a pilot study “Incorporating Lighting and Appliance Energy Consumption into the Home Energy Rating Score” prepared by Architectural Energy Corporation, the statistical average connected lighting load in single family houses is 1.25 W/sqft and the lamps are lit on average 2.34 hours/day.

A monitoring project commissioned by the Bonneville Power Administration and Tacoma Public Utilities referenced on LBL website (http://eetd.lbl.gov/btp/papers/38454.pdf, Tribwell and Lerman, 1996) showed similar results, with an average of 2 hours per day operating time and lighting load of 1.47 W/sqft.

Both studies yield similar daily lighting usage of around 3 Wh/SqFt/Day. This usage is used by TREAT as default. You may modify the default on the Advanced window of the Weather/Defaults screen.

Another helpful link for determining the lighting load of particular building is http://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/lighting/contents.html, which opens a document prepared by Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use of U.S. Department of Energy. The paper presents data on typical lighting energy usage in various residential building types. According to the study, the most of apartments (32.9 percent) consume between 250 and 499 kWh/year. The largest number of mobile homes (24.0 percent) consume between 500 and 749 kWh/year. Among single-family homes, the consumption is higher, with 17.4 percent using between 750 and 999 kWh/year.

The following verification of appliance input is performed:

  1. A summary of the annual appliance usage of each fuel.
  2. There are appliances that use hot water. Typical residential buildings have some appliances, such as clothes washers and dishwashers, which use hot water. Omitting them may result in incorrect DHW consumption.

 

Visual Inspection

This screen allows documenting the result of a visual inspection of the building.

Inspection Location/Type:

This drop down box contains a few locations that may require inspection.

Inspection Name:

This input allows assigning custom names to the inspection.

Observation:

Click this button to display a list of possible problems for the specified location. Check the items that apply to the building. You can also type custom input into the box to the right of the button.

Recommended Action:

This button allows the user to select from a list of recommended actions. You may also make a custom input in the box to the right of the button.

Repair Cost $:

Enter the cost to repair.

Inspection Date:

The default value for this input is the same as the date of the previously entered inspection. Edit it as necessary.

Inspection Wizard:

This button opens the Inspection Wizard screen.

Visual Inspection Wizard

The Inspection Wizard is useful when the same inspections are performed for every project. The inspections that were specified on the Preferences screen are listed in the grid of the wizard.

Observations and Additional Notes:

Clicking in either of these columns allows for the user to quickly select from a range of options for each inspection that you want to add to the project. The check box at the left of the grid can be cleared if you do not want to include that inspection when the Add Selected Observations button is clicked.

Add Selected Observations:

This button closes the wizard and adds the inspection records with a check mark to the project. The user can enter the repair cost for each inspection, if needed, using the main TREAT interface.

Preferences:

This button opens the Preferences screen so that the list of included inspections can be changed.

Cancel:

This button closes the wizard without adding any inspection records to the project.


Measurements

The Measurements screen allows you to document the results of measurements taken in the building.

Location:

This drop-down box contains a few locations that may require measurements.

Measurement Type:

This input lets you select from a list of types.

Measured Value and Units:

These inputs change depending on the selected Measurement Type be sure that you have selected the appropriate value and units.

Problem Description:

This box allows you to type a description of the problem.

Recommended Action:

This box is where you enter a short description of the recommended action to address the problem.

Repair Cost $:

This box is where you enter the cost of repairs.

Inspection Date:

The default value for this date is the same as the date of the previously entered inspection. You can edit it as necessary.

Example:

You performed a blower door test in the building and need to record results in TREAT. Enter the measurements on the Infiltration Screen if you plan to model the building. TREAT will use the test results to calculate infiltration loss. Enter your findings on the Measurements screen if you need to document the test results and include them in the Measurements report, but are not running energy calculations for the model.

Measurement Wizard:

This button opens the Measurement Wizard screen.

Measurement Wizard

The measurements that were specified on the Preferences screen are listed in the grid in this screen. Measured Value can be quickly entered for each measurement. The check box at the left of the grid can be cleared if you do not want to include that measurement when the Add Selected  Measurements button is clicked.

Add Selected Measurements:

This button closes the Wizard and adds the selected measurement records to the project. It can enter the repair cost for each measurement if needed.

Preferences:

This button opens the Preferences screen so that the list of included measurements can be changed.

Cancel:

This button closes the Wizard without adding any measurement records to the project.


Evaluated Options

The Evaluated Options section lets you build improvements and packages to calculate energy saving benefits made to the building envelope, HVAC, domestic hot water system, appliances, lighting, etc.

Improvements:

These inputs are changes to the Base Building components that are described on the Building Model screens. Packages are groups of Improvements. TREAT allows entering multiple options for improving the same existing component.

Example:

The building has electric baseboard heating, which you described on the Heating/Cooling screen. You need to evaluate the feasibility of installing a high efficiency condensing oil boiler versus a regular efficiency oil boiler. In this case you need to define two different Heating Plant improvements as described in the sections below. TREAT will calculate Btu and dollar savings, payback and SIR (savings to investment ratio) for each option, so that you can make an informed decision on which option makes the most economic sense.

If you plan to propose multiple improvements to the homeowner, you may group the improvements in several different packages to fit different budgets or payback periods. Interaction between improvements is accounted for when package savings are calculated.

Note: Most TREAT reports are available for packages and not for improvements. Even if you are proposing a single package, it is still a good idea to group improvements in order to be able to produce reports. It is also possible to define a package consisting of a single improvement.

TREAT calculates the following values for each improvement and package in the project:

Cost:

Improvement cost is taken from the user input for this improvement. Cost of a package is equal to the combined cost of all the improvements in the package.

Annual Savings MMBtu:

Represents the difference between the energy consumption of the Base Building and the building with the improvement. The energy savings are aggregated for all the fuels used in the building.

Example:

You want to evaluate energy savings from replacement of incandescent lighting in the office with new fluorescent fixtures. This change will result in reduced internal heat gains. Due to that you will likely see an increase in the heating energy usage and decrease in the cooling energy usage. Annual Savings displayed on the Improvements and Packages screens include combined change in the consumption of heating and cooling fuels in addition to electricity.

Annual Savings $:

This number is the difference between the total energy cost of the Base Building and the building with improvements.

Payback, Years:

Shows the number of years it will take for the Improvement or Package to pay for itself. It is calculated as a ratio of the improvement cost to the annual dollar savings.

SIR (savings to investment ratio):

This value allows the user to perform a more accurate economic analysis of the improvement feasibility. It compares two alternatives: investing in the improvement versus investing in a bank CD at the specified rate for the term equal to the life of the improvement. The SIR value accounts for inflation. An SIR greater than one indicates that the improvement makes economic sense.

 

Note: SIR is calculated as the ratio of adjusted savings to the investment (cost) of improvement or package. Adjusted improvement savings are calculated using the following formula:

 

 

  • A- calculated improvement $ savings shown on Improvements screen
  • N – improvement life entered on Improvement Wizard screen and shown on Improvements screen
  • e – inflation rate entered on Edit Financial Information screen
  • i – bank rate entered on Edit Financial Information screen.

The adjusted package savings are calculated as sum of adjusted improvement savings.

Cash flow:

This feature is only available in the Packages Screen. Cash flow is useful when the homeowner has to borrow money from the bank to pay for the improvement. Cash flow is calculated as the difference between the annual improvement savings and the loan payments.

You may edit the default rates information on the Improvements screen or the Packages screen by clicking the Edit Financial Information button.


Improvements

The Improvements screen lives in the Evaluated Options section and allows the user to create, edit or delete proposed improvements, calculate energy and dollar savings from improvements, and edit financial information. The screen displays the list of improvements created by the user.

Adding new Improvements are aided by the use of the Improvement Wizard:

Wizard Step 1

Wizard Step 2

Calculate Improvement:

This button is used to calculate the savings for a selected improvement, follow the steps above to build and design improvements.

Calculate All Improvements:

This button will run the calculations for all improvements on the screen for those calculations that have not yet been performed.

Edit Financial Information:

This button opens a window that allows the user to modify the values that are used to calculate SIR (Savings to Investment Ratio) and cash flow.

Lifestyle Savings:

This button opens the Lifestyle Savings screen described separately.

Note: You need to remove an improvement from all the packages that include it before you can delete the improvement on this screen.

Improvement Wizard Step 1 –Improvement Types 

Clicking the Add Improvement button to create a new improvement and open the Improvement Wizard Step 1.

The wizard presents the list of the improvement types that may be modeled in TREAT and guides you through the data input screens that need to be filled out. The following types of improvements are available:

Appliance Replacement:

Remove existing appliance(s) and/or add new one(s).

Cooling System Improvement:

Replace existing cooling system.

Distribution System:

Improve existing heating or central cooling distribution.

Domestic Hot Water Improvement:

  • Water Heater Replacement
  • Water Heater Insulation
  • Water Heater Set point Adjustment
  • Hot Water Piping Insulation
  • Low Flow Device Installation
  • DHW Storage Tank Improvement
  • Recirculation Control Improvement

Door Replacement:

Replace existing doors.

Fan Improvement:

  • Modify existing mechanical ventilation fan(s).
  • Add new fan(s).
  • Remove the fan(s) identified in the Base Building model.

Heating Control Improvement:

Add a reset control to the existing boiler.

Heating Plant Improvement:

Replace the existing primary or back-up heat plant.

Indoor Temperature Control:

Install a programmable thermostat or change thermostat settings.

Infiltration Improvement:

  • Reduce total infiltration of heated spaces.
  • Reduce wall leakage specified in Holes in the Building section of Infiltration screen.
  • Reduce infiltration of unheated spaces defined on Spaces screen.

Lighting Replacement:

Replace the lighting specified on the Lighting screen.

Measurements:

Improve the measurements described on the Measurements screen.

Surface Insulation:

Change insulation and construction of surfaces described on the Walls/Surfaces screen.

Visual Inspection:

Improve problems described on the Visual Inspection screen.

Window Replacement:

Replace existing windows entered on the Windows screen.

Improvement types are listed in alphabetical order.

Use the mouse to select an improvement type and click Next to open the Improvement Wizard Step 2 window. Click Cancel to close the Improvement Wizard window and return to the Improvements screen.

Improvement Wizard Step 2 – Detail Entry

The interface of Improvement Wizard Steps 2 and 3 depends on the improvement type that you have selected. Generally, you will need to enter the following information:

Enter the information required for each improvement type in the white boxes. Most screens also display the relevant information for the Base Building against a gray background. This information may be edited on Building Model screens where it was entered.

Improvement Name:

Generated by TREAT and may be edited by user.

Improvement Life:

This value is set to a default value typical for the selected improvement type. The input is used in SIR calculations and may be adjusted by the user as necessary.

Improvement Cost:

This value may be entered as total cost or unit cost.

  • Total cost input is available for all improvement types.
  • In addition to that, for some improvements the user may choose to enter unit cost instead of total cost by making appropriate selection in Improvement Cost Methods combo box. If unit cost method is selected, then entered unit cost will be automatically adjusted as quantity of improved components (e.g. replaced windows) is changed. Total cost is independent of other improvement inputs.

Edit Workscope:

This button allows selecting a workscope from the library or entering a custom workscope. Workscopes may be saved for future use by adding new Workscopes to their appropriate category in the Libraries dropdown menu. Be sure that your editable libraries are set to upgrade.

Done:

Clicking this button saves the inputs and closes the Improvement Wizard.

Cancel:

Clicking this button closes the Improvement Wizard without saving any information.

Appliance Improvement:

This section is used to add or remove appliances. If you want to remove existing appliances, move them from left to right in the top panel. The lower panel allows the user to specify new appliances. The interface is similar to the Appliances screen of the Building Model section.

Cooling System Improvement:

This screen may be used to specify a new cooling system.

  • Total output capacity, average SEER/EER, type and design supply temperature inputs are used in energy calculations.
  • Number of New Units installed is used with the specified cost of a new unit to calculate the total improvement cost.

The rest of the cooling system inputs are for record keeping and reports. For a central cooling system you may edit distribution system defaults generated by TREAT. If the existing heating or cooling system has forced air distribution, then this distribution system may be reused for the new cooling system.

Note: TREAT does not allow combining cooling and distribution improvements in one package. If you plan to seal or insulate existing ductwork and replace the cooling system, you need to select the New Distribution radio button and enter the new distribution system parameters on this screen.

Distribution Improvement:

Select the existing distribution system that you want to improve on the Improvement Wizard Step 2 screen. As noted above, you will not be able to combine in one package a distribution improvement and a heating or cooling system improvement. Use a Distribution Improvement only if you need to evaluate the effect of improving a distribution system without making any upgrades to existing heating plant or AC system. The screen allows the user to specify new values for all the parameters of the existing distribution system. See the Heating/Cooling screen section for more details on distribution system inputs.

Domestic Hot Water:

This improvement screen is only available if an existing DHW system was entered on the Hot Water screen, in this screen you are presented with several options.

  • Water Heater Replacement: this improvement allows you to specify a new water heater. Inputs are the same as on the Hot Water screen of the Building Model section.
  • Hot Water Heater Insulation: this improvement screen allows you to model the effect of wrapping an existing hot water heater with an insulating blanket.
  • Water Heater Set point: this improvement adjustment screen allows you to model turning down the water heater temperature.
  • Hot Water Pipe Insulation: this improvement screen allows you to model the savings associated with losses from domestic hot water piping.
  • The Low Flow Device Installation: this improvement screen allows you to model the savings associated with reduction in hot water flow rate due to installation of new plumbing fixtures. Savings from reducing waste in overall water usage is not included in this improvement.

Door Replacement:

This improvement allows you to model replacing any number of doors in the model. The left side of the screen contains the list of doors entered on the Exterior Doors screen. If you have multiple doors in the project you may filter them using the search criteria at the top of the left panel. You may replace existing doors of different construction with the new doors that have the same construction as one improvement. Create a separate improvement for each unique door type that you plan to install. TREAT does not allow adding or removing doors or changing door dimensions. Savings are calculated only based on specified new door U-value.

Note: To model the savings from reduced air leakage after the new doors are installed you need to create an Infiltration Improvement.

Fan Improvement:

This improvement allows you to modify an existing fan by adjusting its ventilation rate, schedule and heating recovery efficiency, removing an existing fan, or adding a new fan.

Heating Control Improvement:

This improvement allows the user to model savings from installing a Reset Control on the existing boiler.

Heating Plant Improvement:

This improvement allows the user to model installation of a new primary or secondary heat plant. The new heat plant may share distribution with existing heating or cooling or have a new distribution system. If a new distribution system option is selected, you may edit the default distribution settings by clicking the Edit Distribution button.

A Heating Plant Improvement should be used if a modification or maintenance work is proposed for an existing system that will change the vital system parameters.

 

Indoor Temperature Control Improvement:

This improvement allows the user to modify the set points and schedule of thermostats specified on the Thermostats screen. The most common improvement of this type is programmable thermostat installation. You may also use this improvement to model overheating in the building due to unbalanced distribution. Modeling of overheating due to distribution loss, high base/occupant internal gains and domestic heater stand by loss does not require creating zones with artificially high thermostat set point – it is automatically calculated by TREAT.

Infiltration Reduction:

This improvement allows the user to specify reduction of the total infiltration of heated or unheated space and/or wall leakage entered on the Infiltration screen. This improvement type should be used to model weather-stripping, sealing of the building envelope and infiltration reduction due to door and window replacement.

Lighting Replacement:

This improvement allows the user to replace various existing lighting fixtures with new fixtures of the same type.

Measurement:

This improvement helps to specify the work that needs to be done to improve the problems that were uncovered through various measurements taken during the site visit. You need to have the measurement entered on the Measurements screen in order to be able to specify it as an improvement. TREAT does not calculate the energy savings associated with the measurement improvement. It assumes that the improvement is done to improve indoor air quality and/or occupant safety and comfort.

Surface Insulation:

This improvement allows the user to model any upgrades to existing walls, floors, ceilings or roofs. Use the filter in the left portion of the screen to find the existing surfaces that you would like to improve. You may then move the surfaces to the right panel and specify the single new construction of the improved surface. The current version of TREAT does not allow adding insulation to the existing surface. However, you may easily model it by specifying the proposed surface description that reflects the insulation level of the wall after improvement. Note that you may not change surface size or orientation as part of the improvement.

Visual Inspection:

This improvement may only be created for inspections entered on the Visual Inspection screen. Similar to the measurement improvement, there are no energy savings associated with this improvement type. The non-energy benefits of this improvement will be shown in the reports for the package that contains this improvement.

Window Replacement:

This improvement allows the user to model replacement of existing windows. You may change multiple windows to the new window type (frame and glazing) in a single improvement. Note that any infiltration reduction associated with window replacement should be entered separately as an infiltration improvement. If you have the NFRC ratings for U-Value and SHGC for a particular window, then you may enter these values in the Custom Window Properties dialog. Be aware that the Glazing and Framing type still play a factor in the calculations and must be entered appropriately.


Packages

The Packages screen allows the user to group the improvements created on the Improvements screen. This screen displays all the packages in the project. You may add, edit or delete existing packages and calculate package energy and dollar savings.

 

Calculate Package:

Select a package and click this button to run the calculations for the selected package.

Calculate All Packages:

This button can be used to run calculations for all the packages you created.

Note: Package SIR is displayed as NC if at least one improvement in the package does not have calculated results.

Edit Financial Information:

This button opens a window that allows the user to modify values required to calculate SIR and cash flow.

Delete Package:

Select a package and click this button to remove it. This does not delete the improvements created on Improvements screen and included in the package, it just deletes the way that they are grouped.

To create or modify a package, click the Add Package and Edit Package buttons to open the Package Wizard screen.

Copy Package:

This button creates a copy of the selected package.

Package Name:

Edit the default package name in this box.

Annual Savings $, Payback Years and SIR:

Presented for each Improvement on the Package Wizard screen; these values are adjusted to account for interaction between improvements in the package. These values are different from the non-interacted, independent values presented on the Improvements screen for the same improvement. TREAT uses the following steps to estimate interacted savings:

  • Calculate BTU savings for each improvement in the package. Savings for each fuel and each end use are calculated separately. The end use categories in TREAT are heating, cooling, lighting, appliances, domestic hot water and other. The other category includes such uses as a circulation pump for domestic hot water. If there are two fuels in the project, then 6(end uses) × 2(fuels) = 12 values are calculated for each improvement.
  • Add up the savings for each end use and each fuel calculated in the previous step for all improvements in the package. These values represent the total package savings without accounting for interaction of improvements in the package.
  • Calculate BTU package savings for each fuel and each end use by subtracting the corresponding package usage from the base building usage. These are the actual savings in the package that include interaction.
  • Calculate the interaction penalty for each end use and each fuel by dividing package savings that include interaction (that were obtained in step 3) by non-interacted package savings that were obtained in step 2.
  • Interacted improvement savings are calculated for each fuel and each end use as the product of the individual improvement savings calculated in step 1 and the interaction penalty from step 4. The individual values are then added together to obtain the total interacted improvement savings.
Note: Interacted savings may be less than, equal to or greater than individual improvement savings. Consider a package that has two improvements – a heat plant improvement and an infiltration reduction improvement. Reduced infiltration will decrease the heating load which will result in reduced savings from the heat plant improvement and reduced interacted savings for both improvements. Next consider a package with a heat plant improvement and a lighting improvement. Reduced lighting wattage will increase the heating load, resulting in increased savings from the improved heat plant improvement. In this case the interacted savings for the heat plant improvement may be higher and the interacted savings for the lighting improvement may be lower. It is often hard to anticipate the effect of interaction since the building is a complex physical system with multiple inter-related processes occurring simultaneously. You may enter notes in the Notes field and select the check box to the right if you want the notes to appear on the Improvement Packages report.

If you have already calculated the savings for your improvements, those calculation results will show on the Package Wizard screen. Otherwise, you may select an individual improvement and click the Calculate Improvement button to run calculations for it. Click Calculate All Improvements in Package to run calculations for each improvement and the package itself.

Keep in mind that the sum of improvement savings is usually not equal to the package savings. This happens due to the interaction between the improvements.

Example:

You have entered two improvements – installation of new high efficiency heating system and weather-stripping to reduce infiltration losses. The second improvement reduces building heating load, which decrease the savings from improved heating efficiency.

Add or Remove Improvements in this Package:

This button will allow you to add or remove user created improvements in a specific package button. A new window will open:

The left panel of the window contains all the improvements in the project that are not yet included in this package sorted by the SIR value. The right panel contains improvements that are already included in the package. Total cost of the package is shown at the bottom of the right panel. Move the improvements that you want to include in this package to the right panel. Click the Save button to save your selection, create the package, and close the window.

TREAT verifies that the improvements in the right panel can be combined in a single package. For example TREAT will display an error message and will not save your selection if you have mistakenly included two primary heating system replacements in a single package.


Lifestyle Savings

The improvement wizard screens allow entering physical improvements to the building that are usually installed by professionals, such as replacing heating system, installing programmable thermostats, insulating an attic, etc. However, some of the energy savings may be achieved by simple changes in the lifestyle of building occupants. Turning off lights in the room when leaving, reducing shower times, replacing the furnace filter regularly, cleaning refrigerator coils and other similar actions can often produce significant energy savings with minimal or no investment.

TREAT allows estimating energy savings from occupant behavior by associating variety of lifestyle actions with each improvement entered on the Improvement Wizard screen. The inputs are made on the Lifestyle Savings window, which is accessible from the Improvements or Packages screen by clicking the Lifestyle Savings button.

The screen is divided in two sections. The upper table is non-editable and shows all improvements in the project or in the selected package, depending on the setting of the filter at the top of the screen. The lower table allows editing inputs for the selected improvement.

Only Improvement Name and improvement type are shared between “physical” and “lifestyle” inputs for any given improvement. In the lower table you are able to select your inputs:

Improvement Category:

The drop down box containts the options appropriate for the selected improvement. The category helps to filter the internal TREAT lifestyle action database to display only those actions appropriate for the current improvement. Some improvement types have a single Improvement Category, for example Heat Plant Replacement has only one category – Heating. Appliance Replacement, on the other hand, has multiple categories available for selection, with each category corresponding to a major appliance type.

 

Total Lifestyle Action Cost:

This cost is different from the improvement cost entered on the Improvements screen and represents only lifestyle-related expense. For example, you may model furnace replacement in TREAT and enter the cost of the furnace installation on the Improvement Wizard screen. In addition to that, you may want to educate user regarding importance of regular filter replacement. You may enter filter replacement as a lifestyle action and associate separate cost with it.

The second row of drop down boxes in the lower part of the screen allows specifying the algorithm for calculating lifestyle savings of the selected improvement. The accuracy of lifestyle–related savings is lower than savings from physical improvements to the building because occupant behavior changes with time and there are often no reliable algorithms to predict how certain behaviors affect energy consumption. TREAT uses a simplified approach to lifestyle savings calculations. The user selects the end use to which the savings percent is applied, such as Heating, Cooling, Domestic Hot Water or Usage of fixtures included in the improvement. TREAT then calculates the savings as percent of energy usage for the specified end use in the existing building or in the current improvement. The algorithm options depend on Improvement Category.

For appliance and lighting improvements, the value of heating/cooling interactions is estimated using actual heating and cooling system efficiencies, appliance/lighting location and percent loss to space. An assumption is made regarding heating/cooling season length. If there is cooling in the project, then for the purpose of lifestyle savings each space is assumed to be both heated and cooled. Interaction between improvements in packages is not accounted for.

After Improvement Category is selected, the lower table is filled with default lifestyle actions.

You may edit the name of each Lifestyle Action, change Estimated Savings % and toggle Accepted and Possible fields. The Total Savings percentage in the lower table is updated as you change the inputs. Once improvement data is finalized, save it with the Save button. The Reset to Defaults button cancels all the changes made in the lower table and reverts to default information for the selected Improvement Category. When information in the lower table is saved, the list of accepted lifestyle actions is copied to the upper table.

Accepted and possible savings may be calculated using the two buttons at the bottom of the screen. You must run model calculations for the base building and improvement packages before running lifestyle savings calculations. Inputs on the lifestyle savings screen do not affect improvements and packages cost and savings on any other TREAT screen. The lifestyle savings are summarized on Occupant Lifestyle Savings report.

TREAT Report and Data Access System

Overview

The ability to quickly create useful documents and data is essential to effective business process. TREAT’s newest reporting feature offers the widest possible variety of methods for rendering customer pleasing reports and exporting of data:

  • from the simplest selection of report templates customized with chosen company logo and style,
  • to infinitely flexible office document integration linked to multiple external data sources,
  • Foolproof company customized documents of any style and complexity, dynamically combining corporate data from enterprise databases.

Report Selection Screen

 

Features

  • Customize Brand and Style Easily – make it yours
  • Select Reports Quickly with Intuitive New Interface – see sample preview and descriptions for each selection
  • Add New Reports and Styles at any time – new ones available for download
  • Modify and Create your own Custom Report Design with Microsoft or Open Report Design Tools – or have us do it on demand
  • Integrate Easily with Microsoft or Open Office Suites to Enhance Business Process Flow
  • Merge TREAT Results Data with Enterprise Data Systems – include energy analysis, job cost and schedule information in a single report
  • Open Data Exchange Standards – integrate with any tool of your choosing

Demo Mode:

Report Output Type is set as Static Image (TIFF) while in Demo mode. Additionally, there is a watermark across the page. The image quality in Demo mode Static Images is less than perfect, though it allows you to see all of the pages of a report.

When you purchase a license, this constraint is lifted, along with the watermark on the output. The full range of other output types are available and rendered perfectly sharp.

Standard Reports:

Standard Reports are the quickest and easiest way to start producing reports for presenting to your customers, as well as, viewing assorted analyses of package and billing data. These reports are available in a variety of output formats suitable for fixed reports or editable office documents. Selected data can also, if you desire, be exported to a spreadsheet for further analysis or data linking.

Customization:

Simplified customization of reports is provided by allowing you to insert your own logo and select a style that best fits the image of your company. New Styles and Reports can be added by a user at any time.

See also: How Do I Customize My Reports?

Logo:

Your Company Logo selection is stored along with the Contractor data and accessed through the Contractor data edit dialog. It will be inserted appropriately into Styles that have spaces for company logos.

Styles:

Numerous styles are provided for your selection. These are chosen on the Reports tab of the Options dialog, and are easily accessible via the Report Options button on the bottom of the Reports screen.

Options:

The Report Options also allow selection of the Default Output Type; choose the type that you prefer to print most of the time. You can select a different type each time you produce a report with the selector beside the Run Report button. You will find this set, and unchangeable, as Static Image while in Demo mode.

Report Selection Screen:

The Report Selection screen consists, primarily, of three sections to choose the type of report based on the description, and choose the particular data to display and output type for the report. Convenient access is also provided to change the Company Logo and Style, as well as a link to the web site where new reports will be available.

 

Report Selector:

Here is a categorized list of Reports for selection. Default installation provides a selection of Reports separated into categories that make it easier to find a particular type.

Notice, in the screen shot, that most are listed just as a title; these were created by PSD. If you begin to create or modify your own reports to satisfy your needs, you will enter an Author. It is this name that appears beneath the title of your reports, or ones that you may have downloaded. For example, “Empire State Utilities” and “CheckMate Energy” are additional modified report in the screen shot.

Installing new prepared reports, whether you modified them or you downloaded them from other contributors, is as easy as drag-and-dropping them right on the report selection screen. This may create a folder in your application data folder and merge the titles in with the ones from the installation directory. Easy access to this user report template folder is available through the Report Options dialog. It is through this folder that you can delete or change the name of a report.

Report Description:

This explains what is in the report or what answers it aims to provide. The report graphic is meant only to be representative; it is a, deliberately small, static image generated with sample data and won’t likely exactly match the final report that generated with current data.

Data Selector:

Many of the Reports will be displaying data populated from the TREAT project database. These will require selections of Packages, Billing Periods, and/or additional data tables. The need for data selection will be apparent by the appearance of lists on tab pages below the description area. Each tab will indicate how many items need to be selected from each list. Items in the list are disabled (grey) and unable to be selected when the calculations for the Improvements/Packages or Billing Periods are not complete. If you want to select one of these items, you’ll need to return to the appropriate tab to execute calculations and generate results necessary for the report.

Report Options:

This dialog is for setting up or managing reports; things that you’ll do periodically, but not every time that a report executed.

The Default Report Output Type is for selecting your most common type of output. Each report run is easily changeable on the main report screen for times you wish to use a different type.

Style Selector works rather like the Report Selector. Choose the Style that fits your company image the best, or have one customized exactly to your specifications. A blank Style exists for exporting data reports that don’t benefit from the graphic headers.

Selecting the Add Report button brings you to a place where you can add and remove Report and Style templates. If you simply want to add one that has been prepared, you can drag-and-drop on the selector.

Edit Contractor Data is where you’ll select a company logo, and enter the other business information that will be embedded into Reports.

Formats:

  • Static Image (.TIFF)This image format provides a quick look at the results where reports have the best summary data for a particular aspect of your project. It opens right up in your default image viewer. The image is not, generally, of the quality that one might present to a customer. This is the only option available in Demo mode.
  • Portable Document Format (.PDF)PDF format documents provide a high quality rendering of your report in a widely viewable format. These documents are convenient to print, send, and archive. They are not conveniently editable, which is often a desirable trait. Free viewers are available from http://get.adobe.com/reader/
  • Microsoft Word (.doc)(This format will be available when Microsoft releases the 2010 version of the library) DOC format documents are conveniently editable with one of Mircrosoft’s Office offerings or OpenOffice.org, freely available at http://www.openoffice.org/ , and are suitable for creating reports that you may want to touch up or personalize after rendering.

 

  • Microsoft Excel (.xls)

XLS format documents are conveniently editable with one of Microsoft’s offerings, or OpenOffice.org, which is freely available at http://www.openoffice.org/ , and are suitable for creating reports where raw data is exported in tabular format. Each new Table selected for data exports is created on its own sheet in the Excel workbook; convenient for you to do your own data manipulations and charting.

Charts, along with legend and title, are rendered as a single object that you can cut and paste into your own documents. Tables of data are easy to select and copy.

  • Raw Data (.xml)Data from TREAT is exported in one large xml file with data grouped as administrative, package, and billing information, according to the selections chosen prior to export. This is a convenient way to access that data through programmatic means. Exports, in this format, are best chosen from the Data grouping of the report selector, as the data in the xml is ‘flattened’ for easy import into database tables.see also: Raw XML in the Data Exchange Reference section
  • Filtered Data (.xml)Many reports do additional processing of the Raw Data before presenting it to you. If you see values in a particular Report that you wish to export, you would select that particular report and run it as Filtered Data. While this output is, technically, human readable, it is not in a presentable form that you would get in other non-xml formats.see also: Filtered XML in the Data Exchange Reference section

Download Additional Reports and Styles:

New Styles and Reports will be made as feedback is collected from users. You may view all available Reports and Styles as they become available. Registered users can download and install new ones at any time. The Reports and Styles will be updated on the website as they become available, not, necessarily, coincident with the next release of TREAT.

Suggest Alterations to Existing Reports:

If there are minor changes to Reports that you feel would make them more valuable to you, you are encouraged to provide feedback via the link provided on the Reports screen. This feedback will be considered along with all other, and may result in a changed Report, or a completely new version.

Suggest New Report Types:

When you feel that no current Report provides the results that you are looking for, we encourage you to suggest a new report via the link provided on the Reports screen. The most useful suggestions would include a sample mock-up and a description of when this new report would be used; who is the recipient? what answers will the find in this new report?

Insert A Company Logo:

  • Select Contractor from the Libraries main menu.
  • Click Choose Logo to select your logo image file.
  • Ensure other Contractor Information is correct.
  • Click OK. This information will now appear appropriately in reports.

Acceptable image file types for the logo are BMP and JPG. The space available to the logo in the report is 0.7″ tall by 3″ wide. Any logo image loaded in the space on the report will be scaled to fit this available space. Therefore, it is wise to have your logo image as near this height and width as possible to avoid distortion. This aspect ratio was chosen as it is common among letterhead logos.

Select a Style:

  • Select Options from the Project Group main menu.
  • Select the Reports tab on the Options dialog.
  • Click trough the available Styles listed, and view the sample images.
  • Leave your chosen Style selected and visible in the preview pane, and close the dialog.

Select, View, and Print a Report:

  • Select a report from those available.
  • Select data below the Description, tabs indicate selection requirements.
  • Confirm the output type is as you wish.
  • Click Run Report. The report opens in your system default viewer for a chosen output type, i.e. Acrobat opens PDF files.
  • Make any desired changes, as possible in the chosen format, i.e. spreadsheet applications can modify XLS format files.
  • Print as described in the help for the report format viewer that is open. This will print to standard Windows printers as you normally would.

Export Data Tables to Spreadsheet:

  • Choose the “Blank” Style. Though not necessary, results in a cleaner output.
  • Choose “Spreadsheet” Output Type. Though not necessary, results in an Excel document that is easily linked to from other office documents or databases.
  • Click “Export Data”. The data opens in your system default editor for spreadsheets.

Get New Styles and Reports:

  • Select the More Reports link (http://www.psdconsulting.com/software/treat/reports ) on the Select Reports pane.
  • Browse the available Report and Style templates.
  • Download a new template, saving in any convenient location. You must login and have a current support contract to download, but everyone can browse.
  • Choose Add Report on the Options dialog, or Drag-and-drop the saved file onto the Report Selector.

Office Suite Integration

Office Suites of integrated tools are powerful solutions for businesses to produce their own ad-hoc reports and data exchanges with their current business systems. TREAT software doesn’t attempt to recreate all of these tools for you to create your own custom reports, but leverages the skills of many office suite proficient people to generate and integrate with the well documented data export formats of TREAT.

Tools:

There are many document tools that can link easily to spreadsheet and xml data source. We recommend the following tools for their common capabilities and strong support. Many people choose to purchase Microsoft Office tools; but, for those who don’t wish to, OpenOffice.org is a fantastic office suite with tremendous capabilities – and it is available, fully featured, for free.

Open Office:

Open Office an extra ordinarily capable suite of tools that runs on Windows, Mac OSX, Linux, and many more platforms for free. Open Office is available at http://www.openoffice.org .

Microsoft Office:

Microsoft Office software and information is available at http://office.microsoft.com

Data Export:

While any Report can be written out to an Excel spreadsheet, there are a number of ‘data’ specific reports that are intended for export to Excel and/or XML. These formats are convenient for linking into Office suites to dynamically update the data in fields of a, for example, Word document.

The process to generate a report, therefore, means exporting the data with a standard name to a standard location, then opening linked document which will pick up its new values from the latest export. Adjust the document, if you like, before giving to the customer.

Data Linking:

Other Office Suite components can link into the data from XML or Excel export files.

Support:

The TREAT Reporting system enables a myriad of solutions for business process integration, simply because it exports standard formats. Every situation is different and will require a different method of integration that can best be determined by the TREAT user’s in-house technical staff, or in conjunction with Performance Systems Development. Therefore, PSD can provide examples but, will be unable to detail the implementation of every solution; for these, you are referred to Office solution documentation.

Resources:

Microsoft Office information is available at http://office.microsoft.com.

Open Office information is available at http://www.openoffice.org .

Integration Contracts with PSD:

Contract TREAT sales at http://www.psdconsulting.com/software/treat/contact to discuss how PSD can help you integrate TREAT data into your business process.

Custom Integrated Reports

Tools:

There are two freely available tools for editing Report Definition Language (RDL) files. Both are quite capable, but have a slightly different feature set which can cause difficulties when editing the same RDL file between two different tools.

The PSD RDL Template Integrator is a tool that embeds additional information, and confirms that various elements exist with the correct parameters to work seamlessly in TREAT.

Open Report Definition Language (RDL) Designer:

http://www.fyireporting.com/downloads/SetupRdlProject.msi

This tool is capable and easy to install and use, but has some limitations when used, as TREAT does, with the Microsoft RDL rendering tool.

  • It supports gradients as backgrounds to objects, but Microsoft does not; so, you should be aware not to use that feature in this tool.
  • It doesn’t set bookmarks on tables that are useful in the spreadsheet export of data. Most useful fields are already bookmarked for you in the reports shipped with TREAT. You will need to use the Microsoft tool to add these, if you need them.

Microsoft SSRS – Business Intelligence Tools and Visual Studio Express:

First Microsoft Visual Studio Express is required:

http://www.microsoft.com/express/Downloads/

Then, install on top of that, SSRS packages :

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc966542.aspx#EIAA

Follow Microsoft instructions for configuring your environment to create and edit SSRS solutions.

PSD RDL Template Integrator:

Performance Systems Development provides the tool to take a Report Definition Language Template and prepare it to be integrated it into the TREAT Reports screen. This involves taking an RDL file with the essential elements of either a TREAT Report Template or TREAT Style Template, and generating a Preview Image, adding a Description, and setting various data requirements, categories and type. This tool will also check some requirements of the RDL file for compatibility with the TREAT Report System. Contact PSD to get the latest version of this tool.

Resources:

RDL Designer:

http://www.fyireporting.com/

Microsoft SSRS:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ then use the search entry at the top of the page. There is so much applicable information here in different files.

Customization Contracts with PSD:

Contract TREAT sales at http://www.psdconsulting.com/software/treat/contact to discuss how PSD can help you integrate TREAT data into your business process.

Data Exchange:

There is a huge amount of data available for you to integrate with your business systems. Here is the reference for what data is available, and where to reference it.

HPXML:

TREAT v 3.4 supports an all new data export feature. TREAT can now export data in the HPXML format. This growing national standard consists of hundreds of specific data fields that different state and national programs can select from, the end result being that your data can be used for cross boundary compliance in an expanding number of programs.

Raw XML:

Raw XML is the data dumped from TREAT grouped as:

  • project data
  • packages data
  • billing data
  • building data

Export an XML file with all items selected, then use your favorite editor to view the XML files to determine the available data.

Filtered XML:

Filtered XML is the result of repackaging and reprocessing the Raw XML data into tables and summary results that are used in the reports themselves. Specifically, the “Data” grouping of reports are of little use for human presentable documents, but do process/filter/sort summary data into useful tables, results, and most importantly, numerous bookmarked (named ranges) data result cells that are perfectly suited for Office Suite integration. There is often more data available than is in any one report. Use an editor to view the available data from the XML.

Spreadsheet Cell Bookmarks:

These are the key to Office Suite integration. They provide named locations the retrieve the same known information from a spreadsheet data source. Though the data may change location in the spreadsheet, the bookmarks remain a positive link to the data for linking into other Office Documents in a consistent way.


TREAT Display

TREAT is best displayed when your computer display size is set to 100%. You can alter this setting by clicking “Control Panel” à “Display” and being sure to select “Smaller – 100% (Default)” If you are still having issues with columns in TREAT not lining up you may be experiencing a known windows 7 bug. More information can be found here: http://www.rlvision.com/misc/windows_7_font_bug.asp

WINDOWS 7 FONT SIZE BUG

As explained on this page with further information here, a “feature” in Windows 7 may cause problems for some programs in certain conditions.

Basically, if you have a high resolution screen at install time, Win7 will install a larger font set (125%) by default. If you then choose go back to the standard font size (100%), Windows will keep some of the large fonts even though everything else is adjusted for standard fonts, causing programs that use these fonts to break because the text will not always fit inside the GUI.

THE SOLUTION

By editing the Windows registry you can get the original, intended fonts back:

  • Open the start menu and type regedit and then press Enter.
  • Locate the key HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Fonts
  • Find the value MS Sans Serif 8,10,12,14,18,24
  • Change from SSERIFF.FON to SSERIFE.FON
  • Find MS Serif 8,10,12,14,18,24
  • Change from SERIFF.FON to SERIFE.FON
  • Finally find Courier 10,12,15
  • Change from COURF.FON to COURE.FON
  • Restart your system in order for the changes to take effect!

The exact font names may vary depending on locale settings. Use these tables for reference:

MS Sans Serif 8,10,12,14,18,24
Original Name Change to
SSERIFF.FON SSERIFE.FON
SSERIFFE.FON SSERIFEE.FON
SSERIFFG.FON SSERIFEG.FON
SSERIFFR.FON SSERIFER.FON
SSERIFFT.FON SSERIFET.FON
SSEF1255.FON SSEE1255.FON
SSEF1256.FON SSEE1256.FON
SSEF1257.FON SSEE1257.FON
SSEF874.FON SSEE874.FON
MS Serif 8,10,12,14,18,24
Original Name Change to
SERIFF.FON SERIFE.FON
SERIFFE.FON SERIFEE.FON
SERIFFG.FON SERIFEG.FON
SERIFFR.FON SERIFER.FON
SERIFFT.FON SERIFET.FON
SERF1255.FON SERE1255.FON
SERF1256.FON SERE1256.FON
SERF1257.FON SERE1257.FON
Courier 10,12,15
Original Name Change to
COURF.FON COURE.FON
COURFE.FON COUREE.FON
COURFG.FON COUREG.FON
COURFR.FON COURER.FON
COURFT.FON COURET.FON
COUF1255.FON COUE1255.FON
COUF1256.FON COUE1256.FON
COUF1257.FON COUE1257.FON