Nexus Courses Series

PSD is pleased to introduce a new series of courses! We will start introducing new courses this fall with additional courses added periodically through December. Stay tuned for more information about the release of the following programs.

Residential Courses

  • Electrifying the Energy Code
  • The Energy Code and Existing Buildings
  • Don’t Be Left Exposed – Meeting the Energy Code with the Safe Use of Foam Insulation
  • Put a Lid on It – Unvented Attics and Crawl Spaces

Commercial Courses

  • Electrifying the Energy Code
  • The Energy Code and Existing Buildings
  • Foam Without Flames – Reduced Thermal Bridging and Fire-Rated Assemblies

Electrifying the Energy Code (Residential)

Following an introduction to the benefits of electrification, this course will review the requirements of IECC Appendix RA (Solar-Ready Provisions) along with related requirements including mandatory access and set back areas required by the Fire Code of New York State in Section 1204 Solar Photovoltaic Power Systems. The course will walk through several examples and ask attendees to determine whether the solar-ready provisions apply to a particular building, given its type, orientation, roof design, and other considerations. The course will also review examples of how to fit in the required solar-ready zone considering obstructions and required setbacks. Example documentation will also be reviewed. Finally, the course will cover the electric vehicle service equipment capable requirements of NYStretch and how adopting these provisions will help with the electrification of New York’s transportation system.

Learning objectives:

  • Describe the concept of beneficial electrification
  • Identify and describe energy code provisions that promote beneficial
    electrification
  • Understand relevant requirements from the Fire Code of New York
    State
  • Describe the various systems involved in NYStretch and IECC Appendix
    RA

Electrifying the Energy Code (Commercial) – (Parts 1 & 2)

The first part of the program will cover IECC Appendix CA: Solar-Ready Zone along with related requirements including mandatory access and set back areas required by the Fire Code of New York State in Section 1204 Solar Photovoltaic Power Systems. This section will also discuss what it means to include a “collateral dead load” in gravity and lateral design calculations for the roof. The second part of the program will cover the EV Charging Station Capable requirements and provide detailed coverage of the five additional power distribution packages in NYStretch Appendix CC. A particular emphasis will be placed on how to accomplish the requirements for the more complex packages, including electrical energy monitoring and interoperable automated demand-response.

Learning objectives:

  • Describe the concept of beneficial electrification
  • Identify and describe energy code provisions that promote beneficial
    electrification
  • Understand relevant requirements from the Fire Code of New York
    State
  • Describe the various systems involved in NYStretch Appendix CC:
    Additional Power Distribution Packages.

The Energy Code and Existing Buildings (Residential) – (Parts 1 & 2)

This course will provide a review of IECC Chapter 5 [RE] provisions with an emphasis on situations where work performed on existing buildings requires them to meet the energy code like new construction. This includes additions, new thermal envelope assemblies built as part of an alteration, window replacements, new heating, cooling and duct systems, new service hot water systems, new lighting where 50 percent or more of the luminaires are replaced, changes from unconditioned to conditioned space, and commercial spaces converted to dwelling units. The course will provide numerous examples and ask attendees to identify the energy code requirements for each scenario.

Learning objectives:

  • Determine when construction in existing buildings needs to meet the
    energy code like new construction
  • Determine situations where exceptions apply
  • Utilize REScheck to document determine and document exceptions
  • Understand various prescriptive energy code requirements for
    existing building projects requiring compliance like new construction

The Energy Code and Existing Buildings (Commercial) – (Parts 1 & 2)

This course will provide a review of IECC Chapter 5 [CE] provisions with an emphasis on situations where work performed on existing buildings requires them to meet the energy code like new construction. This includes additions, new thermal envelope assemblies built as part of an alteration, window replacements, new heating, cooling, and duct systems, new service hot water systems, new lighting where 10 percent or more of the luminaires are replaced, changes from unconditioned to conditioned space, and commercial spaces converted to dwelling units. The course will provide numerous examples and ask attendees to identify the energy code requirements for each scenario.

Learning objectives:

  • Determine when construction in existing buildings needs to meet the
    energy code like new construction
  • Determine situations where exceptions apply
  • Understand various prescriptive energy code requirements for
    existing building projects requiring compliance like new construction
  • Describe documentation necessary to take the historic buildings
    exemption

Foam Without Flames – Reduced Thermal Bridging and Fire-Rated Assemblies – (Parts 1 & 2)

Reducing thermal bridging is one of the keys to reducing energy waste in buildings and, to that end, the prescriptive energy code contains requirements for continuous insulation for roofs, above- and below-grade walls, and mass floors. This program will provide an overview of the thermal envelope requirements in the ECCCNYS [CE] and NYStretch [CE] as they relate to continuous insulation. This will be followed by a discussion the types of construction as categorized by the Building Code of New York State (Types I, II, III, IV, V) and associated fire-resistance rating requirements and fire separation distance requirements, and NFPA 285 test for vertical and lateral flame spread as they relate to exterior foam applications.

Learning objectives:

  • Understand the impact of thermal bridging on building energy
    performance
  • Describe the prescriptive requirements in the commercial IECC for
    continuous insulation
  • Determine fire-resistance rating and fire separation distance
    requirements in the context of using continuous insulation
  • Locate third-party testing documentation related to product testing
    for flame spread

Don’t Be Left Exposed – Meeting the Energy Code with the Safe Use of Foam Insulation – (Parts 1 & 2)

Rigid foam board and spray foam insulation are common material choices to help achieve energy code compliance, but when installed improperly can create fire hazards. Foam products general must be covered from the interior with thermal or ignition barriers, but sometimes may be left exposed via “specific approvals.” The challenge for homebuilders, design professionals, insulation contractors, and code officials is knowing which requirements apply to which applications. This course will cover RCNYS requirements for common applications of foam insulation in residential construction, including crawl space walls, basement walls, roofs, attic hatches, knee walls, rim joists, and exterior sheathing. These requirements will be presented in the context of meeting ECCCNYS requirements for these building components.

Learning objectives:

  • Understand the thermal envelope insulation requirements of the
    energy code
  • Differentiate between several categories of common foam insulation
    materials
  • Describe common applications of foam insulation materials and under
    what conditions these products need to be covered
  • Locate and use documentation for “specific applications” for when
    foam may be left exposed

Put a Lid on It – Unvented Attics and Crawl Spaces – (Parts 1 & 2)

Bringing attic and crawl spaces inside the thermal envelope is a great way to simultaneously improve energy efficiency and moisture management. One of the main ways unvented attics and crawl spaces reduce energy waste is by bringing ducts and air handlers inside (which is a requirement of NYStretch and the NYCECC). This can also be cost-effective for builders as they eliminate the requirement for duct testing. But there are risks associated with installing these assemblies improperly, so it is important to meet all related requirements in the RCNYS. For unvented attics, these include a minimum R-value of air-impermeable insulation or above-roof deck insulation and proper installation and location of vapor retarders. For unvented crawl spaces, builders must take care to install vapor barriers over exposed earth and provide a means of evacuating moisture. For both strategies, the use of spray foam also brings in fire safety requirements from the RCNYS for thermal or ignition barriers. This course will provide a review of the benefits of unvented attics and crawl spaces, related building science concepts, and energy and residential code requirements.

Learning objectives:

  • Describe the energy efficiency benefits of unvented attics and crawl
    spaces
  • Describe durability benefits of unvented attics and crawl spaces
  • Understand energy code requirements related to these assemblies
  • Understand residential code requirements for moisture management
    and fire protection

Request a Training

Please contact Jim Pisani for questions or training assistance at (215) 360-6803 or  jpisani@psdconsulting.com.

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